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Blowing the Bridge: A Software Story

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Blowing the Bridge: A Software Story By Peter Bolton
2013 | 94 Pages | ISBN: 1493516809 | EPUB + MOBI | 1 MB

Blowing the Bridge: A Software Story
Sex, drugs, rock'n'rollwe're talking about a hedonistic music festival, right? Nope, not according to the narrator of this tale. Instead, we're talking about an IT department, in the absurd (yet somewhat epic) story about a software project that was doomed to succeed. Exposing some of the more ridiculous aspects of corporate America and the insane characters who haunt its halls, Blowing the Bridge gives the reader a prying peep behind the curtain, at some of the more comical aspects of working with the more colorful personalities in technology. Bitterly funny throughout, it also painstakingly recounts the struggle of a small team determined to navigate a path towards building something of excellence, despite a mine field of bureaucratic stupidity and the occasional mortar round of tempting prostitutes.
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The Battle of Tanga 1914

Ross Anderson – The Battle of Tanga 1914
Tempus Publishing | 2002 | ISBN: 0752423495 | English | 134 pages | PDF | 49.07 MB
On 2 November 1914, obscured by the greater events in Europe, a British convoy of a light cruiser and twelve merchantmen was lying off the German East African port of Tanga, preparatory to the landing of two brigades of the Indian army. It started the main phase of the East African campaign which lasted until after the Armistice in November 1918. The battle of Tanga was the bloody beginning of a long and bitterly fought campaign in tropical Africa conceived as part of a wider plan to conquer Germany's East African empire and ensure British maritime superiority in the Indian Ocean. The ensuing battle proved to be a fiasco for the British, and highlighted the lack of co-ordination between Britain's wartime ministries and the unreadiness of the Indian Army.

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