Tag Archives: eighteenth-century

Enlightened War: German Theories and Cultures of Warfare from Frederick the Great to Clausewitz

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Enlightened War: German Theories and Cultures of Warfare from Frederick the Great to Clausewitz by Elisabeth Krimmer and Patricia Anne Simpson
English | 2011-03-01 | ISBN: 1571134956 | PDF | 362 pages | 2 MB

Enlightened War: German Theories and Cultures of Warfare from Frederick the Great to Clausewitz
Enlightened War investigates the multiple and complex interactions between warfare and Enlightenment thought. Although the Enlightenment is traditionally identified with the ideals of progress, eternal peace, reason, and self-determination, Enlightenment discourse unfolded during a period of prolonged European warfare from the Seven Years' War to the Napoleonic conquest of Europe. The essays in this volume explore the palpable influence of war on eighteenth-century thought and argue for an ideological affinity among war, Enlightenment thought, and its legacy. The essays are interdisciplinary, engaging with history, art history, philosophy, military theory, gender studies, and literature and with historical events and cultural contexts from the early Enlightenment through German Classicism and Romanticism. The volume enriches our understanding of warfare in the eighteenth century and shows how theories and practices of war impacted concepts of subjectivity, national identity, gender, and art. It also sheds light on the contemporary discussion of the legitimacy of violence by juxtaposing theories of war, concepts of revolution, and human rights discourses.
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Improbable Patriot: The Secret History of Monsieur de Beaumarchais

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Harlow Giles Unger, "Improbable Patriot: The Secret History of Monsieur de Beaumarchais"
English | ISBN: 1584659254 | 2011 | PDF | 260 pages | 3 MB

Improbable Patriot: The Secret History of Monsieur de Beaumarchais
Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais was an eighteenth-century French inventor, famed playwright, and upstart near-aristocrat in the court of King Louis XVI. In 1776, he conceived an audacious plan to send aid to the American rebels. What's more, he convinced the king to bankroll the project, and singlehandedly carried it out. By war's end, he had supplied Washington's army with most of its weapons and powder, though he was never paid or acknowledged by the United States.

To some, he was a dashing hero–a towering intellect who saved the American Revolution. To others, he was pure rogue–a double-dealing adventurer who stopped at nothing to advance his fame and fortune. In fact, he was both, and more: an advisor to kings, an arms dealer, and author of some of the most enduring works of the stage, including The Marriage of Figaro and The Barber of Seville.
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The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere

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The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere By Paul Keen
1999 | 314 Pages | ISBN: 0521653258 | PDF | 1 MB

The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere
This book offers an original study of debates that arose in the 1790s about the nature and social role of literature and the new class of readers produced by the revolution in information and literacy in eighteenth-century England. The first part concentrates on the dominant arguments about the role of literature and the status of the author; the second shifts its focus to the debates about working-class activists and radical women authors, and examines the growth of a Romantic ideology within this context of political and cultural turmoil.
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The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere

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The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere By Paul Keen
1999 | 314 Pages | ISBN: 0521653258 | PDF | 1 MB

The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere
This book offers an original study of debates that arose in the 1790s about the nature and social role of literature and the new class of readers produced by the revolution in information and literacy in eighteenth-century England. The first part concentrates on the dominant arguments about the role of literature and the status of the author; the second shifts its focus to the debates about working-class activists and radical women authors, and examines the growth of a Romantic ideology within this context of political and cultural turmoil.
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Acolytes of Nature: Defining Natural Science in Germany, 1770-1850

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Acolytes of Nature: Defining Natural Science in Germany, 1770-1850 By Denise Phillips
2012 | 366 Pages | ISBN: 0226667375 | PDF | 3 MB

Acolytes of Nature: Defining Natural Science in Germany, 1770-1850
Although many of the practical and intellectual traditions that make up modern science date back centuries, the category of "science" itself is a relative novelty. In the early eighteenth century, the modern German word that would later mean "science," naturwissenschaft, was not even included in dictionaries. By 1850, however, the term was in use everywhere. "Acolytes of Nature" follows the emergence of this important new category within German-speaking Europe, tracing its rise from an insignificant eighteenth-century neologism to a defining rallying cry of modern German culture. Today's notion of a unified natural science has been deemed an invention of the mid-nineteenth century. Yet what Denise Phillips reveals here is that the idea of naturwissenschaft acquired a prominent place in German public life several decades earlier. Phillips uncovers the evolving outlines of the category of natural science and examines why Germans of varied social station and intellectual commitments came to find this label useful. An expanding education system, an increasingly vibrant consumer culture and urban social life, the early stages of industrialization, and the emergence of a liberal political movement all fundamentally altered the world in which educated Germans lived, and also reshaped the way they classified knowledge.

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Economics and Its Enemies: Two Centuries of Anti-Economics

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William Oliver Coleman, "Economics and Its Enemies: Two Centuries of Anti-Economics"
English | ISBN: 0333790014 | 2002 | PDF | 325 pages | 2 MB

Economics and Its Enemies: Two Centuries of Anti-Economics
Anti-economics is described as the opposition to the main stream of economic thought that has existed from the eighteenth-century to the present day. This book tells the story of anti-economics in relations to Smith, Ricardo, Mill, Walras, Keynes and Hicks as well as current economic thinkers. William Coleman examines how anti-economics developed from the Enlightenment to the present day and analyzes its various guises.
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Loving Literature: A Cultural History

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Loving Literature: A Cultural History by Deidre Shauna Lynch
English | December 22, 2014 | ISBN: 022618370X | 352 Pages | EPUB/MOBI/AZW3/PDF (Converted) | 9 MB
Of the many charges laid against contemporary literary scholars, one of the most common-and perhaps the most wounding-is that they simply don't love books.

Loving Literature: A Cultural History
And while the most obvious response is that, no, actually the profession of literary studies does acknowledge and address personal attachments to literature, that answer risks obscuring a more fundamental question: Why should they?

That question led Deidre Shauna Lynch into the historical and cultural investigation of Loving Literature. How did it come to be that professional literary scholars are expected not just to study, but to love literature, and to inculcate that love in generations of students? What Lynch discovers is that books, and the attachments we form to them, have long played a role in the formation of private life-that the love of literature, in other words, is neither incidental to, nor inextricable from, the history of literature. Yet at the same time, there is nothing self-evident or ahistorical about our love of literature: our views of books as objects of affection have clear roots in late eighteenth-century and nineteenth-century publishing, reading habits, and domestic history.

While never denying the very real feelings that warm our relationship to books, Loving Literature nonetheless serves as a riposte to those who use the phrase "the love of literature" as if its meaning were transparent, its essence happy and healthy. Lynch writes, "It is as if those on the side of love of literature had forgotten what literary texts themselves say about love's edginess and complexities." With this masterly volume, Lynch restores those edges, and allows us to revel in those complexities.
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Loving Literature: A Cultural History

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Loving Literature: A Cultural History by Deidre Shauna Lynch
English | December 22, 2014 | ISBN: 022618370X | 352 Pages | EPUB/MOBI/AZW3/PDF (Converted) | 9 MB
Of the many charges laid against contemporary literary scholars, one of the most common-and perhaps the most wounding-is that they simply don't love books.

Loving Literature: A Cultural History
And while the most obvious response is that, no, actually the profession of literary studies does acknowledge and address personal attachments to literature, that answer risks obscuring a more fundamental question: Why should they?

That question led Deidre Shauna Lynch into the historical and cultural investigation of Loving Literature. How did it come to be that professional literary scholars are expected not just to study, but to love literature, and to inculcate that love in generations of students? What Lynch discovers is that books, and the attachments we form to them, have long played a role in the formation of private life-that the love of literature, in other words, is neither incidental to, nor inextricable from, the history of literature. Yet at the same time, there is nothing self-evident or ahistorical about our love of literature: our views of books as objects of affection have clear roots in late eighteenth-century and nineteenth-century publishing, reading habits, and domestic history.

While never denying the very real feelings that warm our relationship to books, Loving Literature nonetheless serves as a riposte to those who use the phrase "the love of literature" as if its meaning were transparent, its essence happy and healthy. Lynch writes, "It is as if those on the side of love of literature had forgotten what literary texts themselves say about love's edginess and complexities." With this masterly volume, Lynch restores those edges, and allows us to revel in those complexities.
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Women and Enlightenment in Eighteenth-Century Britain

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Karen O'Brien "Women and Enlightenment in Eighteenth-Century Britain"
Cambridge University Press | English | 2009-04-20 | ISBN: 0521774276 | 318 pages | PDF | 2 MB

Women and Enlightenment in Eighteenth-Century Britain
During the long eighteenth century, ideas of society and of social progress were first fully investigated. These investigations took place in the contexts of economic, theological, historical and literary writings which paid unprecedented attention to the place of women. Combining intellectual history with literary criticism, Karen O'Brien examines the central importance to the British Enlightenment both of women writers and of women as a subject of enquiry. She examines the work of a range of writers, including John Locke, Mary Astell, David Hume, Adam Smith, Edward Gibbon, T. R. Malthus, the Bluestockings, Catharine Macaulay, Mary Wollstonecraft and the first female historians of the early nineteenth century. She explores the way in which Enlightenment ideas created a language and a framework for understanding the moral agency and changing social roles of women, without which the development of nineteenth-century feminism would not have been possible.
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Amphibious Thing: The Life of Lord Hervey

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Amphibious Thing: The Life of Lord Hervey by Lucy Moore
English | Dec 22, 2014 | ISBN: 067087986X, 0140273646 | ASIN: B00RD0FUAU | 351 Pages | EPUB/MOBI/AZW3/PDF (Converted) | 4 MB
Lord Hervey — strikingly handsome courtier, confidant of Queen Caroline and right-hand man to Prime Minister Walpole — was the darling of the glittering court of George II.

Amphibious Thing: The Life of Lord Hervey
Painted by Hogarth and satirized by Fielding and Pope, he counted among his friends and enemies some of the most brilliant men and women of the eighteenth century.

In private, however, he led a rakish life that was — even by the mores of the age’s debauched aristocracy — scandalous.

In ‘Amphibious Thing’, Lucy Moore brings to life the intrigues, the illicit liaisons and the petty rivalries that surrounded Lord Hervey and that finally led to his fall from grace.

‘An entertaining portrait of eighteenth century aristocratic society, filled with juicy anecdotes, flamboyant characters and wild eccentricity.’ – Mail on Sunday

‘A highly intelligent, supremely enjoyable biographical study of the life and times of a celebrated rake and a brilliant picture of eighteenth-century aristocratic life in all its brittle artifice.’ – Robert McCrum, Observer

‘In Moore’s deft hands Lord Hervey becomes the peg on which to hang a far larger picture, and this excellent book has much of importance to say about the society, politics and attitudes of his day…Moore is an exciting historian with a keen eye for the eccentric and offbeat…an exemplary work.’ – New Statesman

‘A vivid survey of courtly life, with its elaborate feasts and intimate parlour games, polite formal rituals and spiteful personal squabbles.’ – The Times Literary Supplement

‘The court life, wit, clothes and sheer flamboyance of the era comes brilliantly alive.’ – Daily Telegraph

Lucy Moore was born in 1970 and educated in Britain and the United States before reading history at Edinburgh University. She is the editor of ‘Con Men and Cutpurses: Scenes from the Hogarthian Underworld’, and the author of the critically acclaimed ‘The Thieves’ Opera: The Remarkable Lives and Deaths of Jonathan Wild, Thief-Taker, and Jack Sheppard, House-Breaker’.
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