Tag Archives: ethnohistorical

Tales of Gotham, Historical Archaeology, Ethnohistory and Microhistory of New York City

FREEDownload : Tales of Gotham, Historical Archaeology, Ethnohistory and Microhistory of New York City

Tales of Gotham, Historical Archaeology, Ethnohistory and Microhistory of New York City by Meta F. Janowitz and Diane Dallal
English | ISBN: 1461452716 | 2013 | PDF | 389 pages | 10 MB

Tales of Gotham, Historical Archaeology, Ethnohistory and Microhistory of New York City
Historical Archaeology of New York City is a collection of narratives about people who lived in New York City during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, people whose lives archaeologists have encountered during excavations at sites where these people lived or worked. The stories are ethnohistorical or microhistorical studies created using archaeological and documentary data. As microhistories, they are concerned with particular people living at particular times in the past within the framework of world events. The world events framework will be provided in short introductions to chapters grouped by time periods and themes. The foreword by Mary Beaudry and the afterword by LuAnne DeCunzo bookend the individual case studies and add theoretical weight to the volume. Historical Archaeology of New York City focuses on specific individual life stories, or stories of groups of people, as a way to present archaeological theory and research. Archaeologists work with material culture-artifacts-to recreate daily lives and study how culture works; this book is an example of how to do this in a way that can attract people interested in history as well as in anthropological theory.
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Computing Concepts with C Essentials

FREEDownload : Computing Concepts with C++ Essentials

Computing Concepts with C++ Essentials By Cay S. Horstmann
1997 | 688 Pages | ISBN: 0471137707 | scanned PDF | 53 MB
This text allows introductory computer science to be taught in a language as powerful as C++. The author distills C++ down to a core of fundamental data types, structures, and syntax so that the instructor and student can concentrate on the essentials of programming. Objects are introduced in two stages. From the second chapter on, students learn how to use predefined classes, in particular strings, streams and graphical shapes. Students should become comfortable with the concepts of creating and using objects. A conscious effort is made to reduce the technical complexities of C++.

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How “Natives” Think: About Captain Cook, For Example

Marshall David Sahlins, "How "Natives" Think: About Captain Cook, For Example"
English | 1995 | ISBN: 0226733688 | 328 pages | PDF | 122 MB
When Western scholars write about non-Western societies, do they inevitably perpetuate the myths of European imperialism? Can they ever articulate the meanings and logics of non-Western peoples? Who has the right to speak for whom? Questions such as these are among the most hotly debated in contemporary intellectual life. In How "Natives" Think, Marshall Sahlins addresses these issues head on, while building a powerful case for the ability of anthropologists working in the Western tradition to understand other cultures.

In recent years, these questions have arisen in debates over the death and deification of Captain James Cook on Hawai'i Island in 1779. Did the Hawaiians truly receive Cook as a manifestation of their own god Lono? Or were they too pragmatic, too worldly-wise to accept the foreigner as a god? Moreover, can a "non-native" scholar give voice to a "native" point of view? In his 1992 book The Apotheosis of Captain Cook, Gananath Obeyesekere used this very issue to attack Sahlins's decades of scholarship on Hawaii. Accusing Sahlins of elementary mistakes of fact and logic, even of intentional distortion, Obeyesekere portrayed Sahlins as accepting a naive, enthnocentric idea of superiority of the white man over "natives"–Hawaiian and otherwise. Claiming that his own Sri Lankan heritage gave him privileged access to the Polynesian native perspective, Obeyesekere contended that Hawaiians were actually pragmatists too rational and sensible to mistake Cook for a god.

Curiously then, as Sahlins shows, Obeyesekere turns eighteenth-century Hawaiians into twentieth-century modern Europeans, living up to the highest Western standards of "practical rationality." By contrast, Western scholars are turned into classic custom-bound "natives", endlessly repeating their ancestral traditions of the White man's superiority by insisting Cook was taken for a god. But this inverted ethnocentrism can only be supported, as Sahlins demonstrates, through wholesale fabrications of Hawaiian ethnography and history–not to mention Obeyesekere's sustained misrepresentations of Sahlins's own work. And in the end, although he claims to be speaking on behalf of the "natives," Obeyesekere, by substituting a home-made "rationality" for Hawaiian culture, systematically eliminates the voices of Hawaiian people from their own history.

How "Natives" Think goes far beyond specialized debates about the alleged superiority of Western traditions. The culmination of Sahlins's ethnohistorical research on Hawaii, it is a reaffirmation for understanding difference.

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