Tag Archives: Ferdinand

Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle

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Andrea Hiott, "Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle"
English | ISBN: 0345521420 | 2012 | EPUB | 512 pages | 7 MB

Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle
Sometimes achieving big things requires the ability to think small. This simple concept was the driving force that propelled the Volkswagen Beetle to become an avatar of American-style freedom, a household brand, and a global icon. The VW Bug inspired the ad men of Madison Avenue, beguiled Woodstock Nation, and has recently been re-imagined for the hipster generation. And while today it is surely one of the most recognizable cars in the world, few of us know the compelling details of this car's story. In Thinking Small, journalist and cultural historian Andrea Hiott retraces the improbable journey of this little car that changed the world.

Andrea Hiott's wide-ranging narrative stretches from the factory floors of Weimar Germany to the executive suites of today's automotive innovators, showing how a succession of artists and engineers shepherded the Beetle to market through periods of privation and war, reconstruction and recovery. Henry Ford's Model T may have revolutionized the American auto industry, but for years Europe remained a place where only the elite drove cars. That all changed with the advent of the Volkswagen, the product of a Nazi initiative to bring driving to the masses. But Hitler's concept of "the people's car" would soon take on new meaning. As Germany rebuilt from the rubble of World War II, a whole generation succumbed to the charms of the world's most huggable automobile.

Indeed, the story of the Volkswagen is a story about people, and Hiott introduces us to the men who believed in it, built it, and sold it: Ferdinand Porsche, the visionary Austrian automobile designer whose futuristic dream of an affordable family vehicle was fatally compromised by his patron Adolf Hitler's monomaniacal drive toward war; Heinrich Nordhoff, the forward-thinking German industrialist whose management innovations made mass production of the Beetle a reality; and Bill Bernbach, the Jewish American advertising executive whose team of Madison Avenue mavericks dreamed up the legendary ad campaign that transformed the quintessential German compact into an outsize worldwide phenomenon.

Thinking Small is the remarkable story of an automobile and an idea. Hatched in an age of darkness, the Beetle emerged into the light of a new era as a symbol of individuality and personal mobility-a triumph not of the will but of the imagination.
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Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle

FREEDownload : Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle

Andrea Hiott, "Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle"
English | ISBN: 0345521420 | 2012 | EPUB | 512 pages | 7 MB

Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle
Sometimes achieving big things requires the ability to think small. This simple concept was the driving force that propelled the Volkswagen Beetle to become an avatar of American-style freedom, a household brand, and a global icon. The VW Bug inspired the ad men of Madison Avenue, beguiled Woodstock Nation, and has recently been re-imagined for the hipster generation. And while today it is surely one of the most recognizable cars in the world, few of us know the compelling details of this car's story. In Thinking Small, journalist and cultural historian Andrea Hiott retraces the improbable journey of this little car that changed the world.

Andrea Hiott's wide-ranging narrative stretches from the factory floors of Weimar Germany to the executive suites of today's automotive innovators, showing how a succession of artists and engineers shepherded the Beetle to market through periods of privation and war, reconstruction and recovery. Henry Ford's Model T may have revolutionized the American auto industry, but for years Europe remained a place where only the elite drove cars. That all changed with the advent of the Volkswagen, the product of a Nazi initiative to bring driving to the masses. But Hitler's concept of "the people's car" would soon take on new meaning. As Germany rebuilt from the rubble of World War II, a whole generation succumbed to the charms of the world's most huggable automobile.

Indeed, the story of the Volkswagen is a story about people, and Hiott introduces us to the men who believed in it, built it, and sold it: Ferdinand Porsche, the visionary Austrian automobile designer whose futuristic dream of an affordable family vehicle was fatally compromised by his patron Adolf Hitler's monomaniacal drive toward war; Heinrich Nordhoff, the forward-thinking German industrialist whose management innovations made mass production of the Beetle a reality; and Bill Bernbach, the Jewish American advertising executive whose team of Madison Avenue mavericks dreamed up the legendary ad campaign that transformed the quintessential German compact into an outsize worldwide phenomenon.

Thinking Small is the remarkable story of an automobile and an idea. Hatched in an age of darkness, the Beetle emerged into the light of a new era as a symbol of individuality and personal mobility-a triumph not of the will but of the imagination.
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Assuming a Body: Transgender and Rhetorics of Materiality

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Gayle Salamon, "Assuming a Body: Transgender and Rhetorics of Materiality"
English | ISBN: 023114959X, 0231149581 | 2010 | 208 pages | PDF | 12 MB

Assuming a Body: Transgender and Rhetorics of Materiality
We believe we know our bodies intimately–that their material reality is certain and that this certainty leads to an epistemological truth about sex, gender, and identity. By exploring and giving equal weight to transgendered subjectivities, however, Gayle Salamon upends these certainties. Considering questions of transgendered embodiment via phenomenology (Maurice Merleau-Ponty), psychoanalysis (Sigmund Freud and Paul Ferdinand Schilder), and queer theory, Salamon advances an alternative theory of normative and non-normative gender, proving the value and vitality of trans experience for thinking about embodiment. Salamon suggests that the difference between transgendered and normatively gendered bodies is not, in the end, material. Rather, she argues that the production of gender itself relies on a disjunction between the "felt sense" of the body and an understanding of the body's corporeal contours, and that this process need not be viewed as pathological in nature. Examining the relationship between material and phantasmatic accounts of bodily being, Salamon emphasizes the productive tensions that make the body both present and absent in our consciousness and work to confirm and unsettle gendered certainties. She questions traditional theories that explain how the body comes to be–and comes to be made one's own–and she offers a new framework for thinking about what "counts" as a body. The result is a groundbreaking investigation into the phenomenological life of gender.
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1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half

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Stephen R. Bown, "1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half"
English | 2012-02-14 | ISBN: 0312616120, 1553655567 | 304 pages | EPUB, MOBI | 5 MB

1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half
In 1494, award-winning author Stephen R. Bown tells the untold story of the explosive feud between monarchs, clergy, and explorers that split the globe between Spain and Portugal and made the world's oceans a battleground.

When Columbus triumphantly returned from America to Spain in 1493, his discoveries inflamed an already-smouldering conflict between Spain's renowned monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, and Portugal's João II. Which nation was to control the world's oceans? To quell the argument, Pope Alexander VI-the notorious Rodrigo Borgia-issued a proclamation laying the foundation for the Treaty of Tordesillas of 1494, an edict that created an imaginary line in the Atlantic Ocean dividing the entire known (and unknown) world between Spain and Portugal.

Just as the world's oceans were about to be opened by Columbus's epochal voyage, the treaty sought to limit the seas to these two favored Catholic nations. The edict was to have a profound influence on world history: it propelled Spain and Portugal to superpower status, steered many other European nations on a collision course, and became the central grievance in two centuries of international espionage, piracy, and warfare.

The treaty also began the fight for "the freedom of the seas"-the epic struggle to determine whether the world's oceans, and thus global commerce, would be controlled by the decree of an autocrat or be open to the ships of any nation-a distinctly modern notion, championed in the early seventeenth century by the Dutch legal theorist Hugo Grotius, whose arguments became the foundation of international law.

At the heart of one of the greatest international diplomatic and political agreements of the last five centuries were the strained relationships and passions of a handful of powerful individuals. They were linked by a shared history, mutual animosity, and personal obligations-quarrels, rivalries, and hatreds that dated back decades. Yet the struggle ultimately stemmed from a young woman's determination to defy tradition and the king, and to choose her own husband.
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Ferdinand von Schirach – Tabu

Ferdinand von Schirach – Tabu
Deutsch | Gegenwartsliteratur | September 2013 | ISBN: 9783492055697 | 256 Seiten | epub, mobi, pdf, lrf, rtf, txt, fb2 | 4.1 MB
Ein Knstler und ein Anwalt versuchen zu begreifen, was Wahrheit ist … Ferdinand von Schirachs neues Buch ist ein Knstlerroman, ein Justizdrama und am Ende ist es eine Beschreibung der Abgrnde des Menschen.
Sebastian von Eschburg verliert als Kind durch den Selbstmord seines Vaters den Halt. Er versucht sich durch die Kunst zu retten. Er zeigt mit seinen Fotografien und Videoinstallationen, dass Wirklichkeit und Wahrheit verschiedene Dinge sind. Es geht um Schnheit, Sex und die Einsamkeit des Menschen. Als Eschburg vorgeworfen wird, eine junge Frau gettet zu haben, bernimmt Konrad Biegler die Verteidigung. Der alte Anwalt versucht dem Knstler zu helfen – und damit sich selbst.
Schirach schreibt ber ein aktuelles gesellschaftliches Thema, das den Leser zwingt, grundstzliche Entscheidungen zu treffen. Aber dieses Buch ist viel mehr: Schirach hat den Roman eines Lebens geschrieben, lakonisch, poetisch, berhrend.
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