Tag Archives: feud

Blood and Violence in Early Modern France

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Stuart Carroll "Blood and Violence in Early Modern France"
Oxford University Press | 2006-07-03 | ISBN: 0199290458 | 384 pages | PDF | 5 MB

Blood and Violence in Early Modern France
The rise of civilized conduct and behaviour has long been seen as one of the major factors in the transformation from medieval to modern society. Thinkers and historians alike argue that violence progressively declined as men learned to control their emotions. The feud is a phenomenon associated with backward societies, and in the West duelling codified behaviour and channelled aggression into ritualised combats that satisfied honour without the shedding of blood. French manners and codes of civility laid the foundations of civilized Western values. But as this original work of archival research shows we continue to romanticize violence in the era of the swashbuckling swordsman. In France, thousands of men died in duels in which the rules of the game were regularly flouted. Many duels were in fact mini-battles and must be seen not as a replacement of the blood feud, but as a continuation of vengeance-taking in a much bloodier form. This book outlines the nature of feuding in France and its intensification in the wake of the Protestant Reformation, civil war and dynastic weakness, and considers the solutions proposed by thinkers from Montaigne to Hobbes. The creation of the largest standing army in Europe since the Romans was one such solution, but the militarization of society, a model adopted throughout Europe, reveals the darker side of the civilizing process.
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1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half

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Stephen R. Bown, "1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half"
English | 2012-02-14 | ISBN: 0312616120, 1553655567 | 304 pages | EPUB, MOBI | 5 MB

1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half
In 1494, award-winning author Stephen R. Bown tells the untold story of the explosive feud between monarchs, clergy, and explorers that split the globe between Spain and Portugal and made the world's oceans a battleground.

When Columbus triumphantly returned from America to Spain in 1493, his discoveries inflamed an already-smouldering conflict between Spain's renowned monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, and Portugal's João II. Which nation was to control the world's oceans? To quell the argument, Pope Alexander VI-the notorious Rodrigo Borgia-issued a proclamation laying the foundation for the Treaty of Tordesillas of 1494, an edict that created an imaginary line in the Atlantic Ocean dividing the entire known (and unknown) world between Spain and Portugal.

Just as the world's oceans were about to be opened by Columbus's epochal voyage, the treaty sought to limit the seas to these two favored Catholic nations. The edict was to have a profound influence on world history: it propelled Spain and Portugal to superpower status, steered many other European nations on a collision course, and became the central grievance in two centuries of international espionage, piracy, and warfare.

The treaty also began the fight for "the freedom of the seas"-the epic struggle to determine whether the world's oceans, and thus global commerce, would be controlled by the decree of an autocrat or be open to the ships of any nation-a distinctly modern notion, championed in the early seventeenth century by the Dutch legal theorist Hugo Grotius, whose arguments became the foundation of international law.

At the heart of one of the greatest international diplomatic and political agreements of the last five centuries were the strained relationships and passions of a handful of powerful individuals. They were linked by a shared history, mutual animosity, and personal obligations-quarrels, rivalries, and hatreds that dated back decades. Yet the struggle ultimately stemmed from a young woman's determination to defy tradition and the king, and to choose her own husband.
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Arming the Two Koreas: State, Capital and Military Power

Taik-Young Hamm, Michael Leifer, "Arming the Two Koreas: State, Capital and Military Power"
1999 | pages: 257 | ISBN: 0415207924 | PDF | 11,5 mb
North Korea has traditionally been seen as militarily superior to South Korea in the long feud between the two nations. This brilliantly argued book taps into a great deal of news interest in North Korea at the moment in the wake of recent hostility against Japan. Hamm controversially shows that the received idea of Koreas military strength is partly a myth created by South Korea to justify a huge programme of rearmament.

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