Tag Archives: Galileo's

Music and Science in the Age of Galileo

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Music and Science in the Age of Galileo (The Western Ontario Series in Philosophy of Science) by V. Coelho
English | Jan 5, 2011 | ISBN: 9048142180 | 252 Pages | PDF | 7 MB
Music and Science in the Age of Galileo features twelve new essays by leading specialists in the fields of musicology, history of science, astronomy, philosophy, and instrument building that explore the relations between music and the scientific culture of Galileo's time. The essays take a broad historical approach towards understanding such topics as the role of music in Galileo's experiments and in the scientific revolution, the musical formation of scientists, Galileo's impact on the art and music of his time, the scientific knowledge of instrument builders, and the scientific experiments and cultural context of Galileo's father, Vincenzo Galilei.

Music and Science in the Age of Galileo
This volume opens up new areas in both musicology and the history of science, and twists together various strands of parallel work by musicians and scientists on Galileo and his time.
This book will be of interest to musicologists, historians of science and those interested in interdisciplinary perspectives of the late Renaissance — early Baroque. For its variety of approaches, it will be a valuable collection of readings for graduate students, and those seeking a more integrated approach to historical problems.
The book will be of interest to historians of science, philosophers, musicologists, astronomers, and mathematicians.
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Thus Spoke Galileo: The Great Scientist’s Ideas and Their Relevance to the Present Day

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Andrea Frova, "Thus Spoke Galileo: The Great Scientist's Ideas and Their Relevance to the Present Day"
English | ISBN: 019960682X, 0198566255 | 2006 | 514 pages | PDF | 3 MB

Thus Spoke Galileo: The Great Scientist’s Ideas and Their Relevance to the Present Day
You might know what is said about Galileo, but not many people know what Galileo himself actually said! His elusive and often misquoted discourse has resulted, over the years, in slurs against his name and reputation as a scientist. Let him speak then, so that he can bring to everyone's attention his message of reason, of intellectual honesty, and of free thinking. A message that, more than ever, is of great relevance in the rampant irrationality of the new millennium.
The exposition begins with a blunt 'self-portrait'. A 'forgery' of course, based mainly on extracts from Galileo's writings and private letters; something he would never have dared, nor been allowed, to write for the public. The selection of writings offered includes many of the subjects that were closest to Galileo's heart and mind with lively commentary from both the literary, scientific, and historical viewpoints. For those who want to know the mathematics behind Galileo's theories, each chapter closes with a separate self contained summary.
Thus Spoke Galileo will allow the reader to appreciate the work and the writing-style of a great scientist and author who had a tremendous influence on the modern world.
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Intellectual Curiosity and the Scientific Revolution

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Intellectual Curiosity and the Scientific Revolution
English | 358 pages | ISBN-10: 1107000823 | PDF | 2.84 MB

Seventeenth-century Europe witnessed an extraordinary flowering of discoveries and innovations. This study, beginning with the Dutch-invented telescope of 1608, casts Galileo's discoveries into a global framework. Although the telescope was soon transmitted to China, Mughal India, and the Ottoman Empire, those civilizations did not respond as Europeans did to the new instrument. In Europe, there was an extraordinary burst of innovations in microscopy, human anatomy, optics, pneumatics, electrical studies, and the science of mechanics. Nearly all of those aided the emergence of Newton's revolutionary grand synthesis, which unified terrestrial and celestial physics under the law of universal gravitation. That achievement had immense implications for all aspects of modern science, technology, and economic development. The economic implications are set out in the concluding epilogue. All these unique developments suggest why the West experienced a singular scientific and economic ascendancy of at least four centuries.

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