Tag Archives: imposed

Contestation and Adaptation: The Politics of National Identity in China

FREEDownload : Contestation and Adaptation: The Politics of National Identity in China

Enze Han, "Contestation and Adaptation: The Politics of National Identity in China"
2013 | ISBN-10: 0199936293 | 240 pages | PDF | 13 MB

Contestation and Adaptation: The Politics of National Identity in China
Contestation and Adaptation unravels the complexities of national-identity contestation among various ethnic minority groups in China. It focuses on the interactions between domestic and international forces that inform ethnic groups' national-identity contestation, positing a theoretical framework where international factors play a significant role in determining why and when ethnic groups will contest the national identities imposed on them by central governments as part of the nation-building process.

Simmering grievances and occasional outbursts of social unrest among ethnic minority populations in China challenge not only the ruling party's legitimacy and governance, but also contemporary Chinese national identity and the territorial integrity of the Chinese state. But, as Enze Han points out, of the fifty-five ethnic minority groups in China, only the Tibetans and Uyghurs have forcefully contested the idea of a Chinese national identity. He argues that whether ethnic groups contest those national identities depends on whether they perceive a better, achievable alternative. In particular, Han argues that ethnic groups with extensive external kinship networks are most likely to perceive a capacity to achieve better circumstances and are, therefore, more likely to politically mobilize to contest national identity. In the absence of such alternatives ethnic groups are more likely to cope with their situation through emigration, political ambivalence, or assimilation. Using this theoretical framework, the book compares the way that five major ethnic minority groups in China negotiate their national identities with the Chinese nation-state: Uyghurs, Chinese Koreans, Dai, Mongols, and Tibetans. Overall, Contestation and Adaptation sheds light on the nation-building processes in China over the past six decades and the ways that different groups have resisted or acquiesced in their dealings with the Chinese state and majority Han Chinese society.
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Max Speed

rapidgator_net:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




China Contested: Western Powers in East Asia

FREEDownload : China Contested: Western Powers in East Asia

Matthew J. Flynn "China Contested: Western Powers in East Asia"
Chelsea House Publications | English | 2006-07-30 | ISBN: 079108650X | 132 pages | PDF | 2,4 MB

China Contested: Western Powers in East Asia
Riding the wave of one of the most accelerated economic expansions in history, China is on the brink of emerging as a global juggernaut. One of the chief reasons for its success has been its ability to unite itself, expel the physical presence of Western powers from its soil, and reoccupy Hong Kong and Macao. "" examines the country's artificial divisions over time, tracing interference by the West back to the early 16th century. This intrusion peaked during the establishment of Western spheres of influence in the late 19th century, yet it continues to resonate today with the standoff over Taiwan. Author Matthew J. Flynn points out that while China has endured many divisions throughout its past, the borders imposed by the West were strictly political and had no geographic or historical basis. "China Contested" will help students grasp the concept that China's determination to be recognized as a great power coincided with its resolve to eliminate the arbitrary borders created by the West.
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Max Speed

rapidgator_net:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




China Contested: Western Powers in East Asia

FREEDownload : China Contested: Western Powers in East Asia

Matthew J. Flynn "China Contested: Western Powers in East Asia"
Chelsea House Publications | English | 2006-07-30 | ISBN: 079108650X | 132 pages | PDF | 2,4 MB

China Contested: Western Powers in East Asia
Riding the wave of one of the most accelerated economic expansions in history, China is on the brink of emerging as a global juggernaut. One of the chief reasons for its success has been its ability to unite itself, expel the physical presence of Western powers from its soil, and reoccupy Hong Kong and Macao. "" examines the country's artificial divisions over time, tracing interference by the West back to the early 16th century. This intrusion peaked during the establishment of Western spheres of influence in the late 19th century, yet it continues to resonate today with the standoff over Taiwan. Author Matthew J. Flynn points out that while China has endured many divisions throughout its past, the borders imposed by the West were strictly political and had no geographic or historical basis. "China Contested" will help students grasp the concept that China's determination to be recognized as a great power coincided with its resolve to eliminate the arbitrary borders created by the West.
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Max Speed

rapidgator_net:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




The Question of Canon: Challenging the Status Quo in the New Testament Debate

FREEDownload : The Question of Canon: Challenging the Status Quo in the New Testament Debate

The Question of Canon: Challenging the Status Quo in the New Testament Debate by Michael J. Kruger
English | 2013 | ISBN: 0830840311 | 256 pages | PDF | 5 MB

The Question of Canon: Challenging the Status Quo in the New Testament Debate
2013 Preaching Survey of the Year's Best Books for Preachers Did the New Testament canon arise naturally from within the early Christian faith? Were the books written as Scripture, or did they become Scripture by a decision of the second-century church? Why did early Christians have a canon at all? These are the types of questions that led Michael J. Kruger to pick apart modern scholarship’s dominant view that the New Testament is a late creation of the church imposed on books originally written for another purpose. Calling into question this commonly held "extrinsic" view, Kruger here tackles the five most prevalent objections to the classic understanding of a quickly emerging, self-authenticating collection of authoritative scriptures. Already a noted author on the subject of the New Testament canon, Kruger addresses foundational and paradigmatic assumptions of the extrinsic model as he provides powerful rebuttals and further support for the classic, "intrinsic" view. This framework recognizes the canon as the product of internal forces evolving out of the historical essence of Christianity, not a development retroactively imposed by the church upon books written hundreds of years before. Unlike many books written on the emergence of the New Testament canon that ask "when?" or "how?" Kruger focuses this work on the "why?"—exposing weaknesses in the five major tenets of the extrinsic model as he goes. While The Question of Canon scrutinizes today’s popular scholastic view, it also offers an alternative concept to lay a better empirical foundation for biblical canon studies.

DOWNLOAD LINKS
Please consider buying premium to get resumable and maximum speed downloads

nitroflare_com:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




Champlain’s Dream

FREEDownload : Champlain’s Dream

Champlain's Dream by David Hackett Fischer
2009 | ISBN: 1416593330, 1416593322, 030739767X | English | 848 pages | EPUB | 18 MB

Champlain’s Dream
In this sweeping, enthralling biography, acclaimed historian David Hackett Fischer brings to life the remarkable Samuel de Champlain — soldier, spy, master mariner, explorer, cartographer, artist, and Father of New France.

Born on France's Atlantic coast, Champlain grew to manhood in a country riven by religious warfare. The historical record is unclear on whether Champlain was baptized Protestant or Catholic, but he fought in France's religious wars for the man who would become Henri IV, one of France's greatest kings, and like Henri, he was religiously tolerant in an age of murderous sectarianism. Champlain was also a brilliant navigator. He went to sea as a boy and over time acquired the skills that allowed him to make twenty-seven Atlantic crossings without losing a ship.

But we remember Champlain mainly as a great explorer. On foot and by ship and canoe, he traveled through what are now six Canadian provinces and five American states. Over more than thirty years he founded, colonized, and administered French settlements in North America. Sailing frequently between France and Canada, he maneuvered through court intrigue in Paris and negotiated among more than a dozen Indian nations in North America to establish New France. Champlain had early support from Henri IV and later Louis XIII, but the Queen Regent Marie de Medici and Cardinal Richelieu opposed his efforts. Despite much resistance and many defeats, Champlain, by his astonishing dedication and stamina, finally established France's New World colony. He tried constantly to maintain peace among Indian nations that were sometimes at war with one another, but when he had to, he took up arms and forcefully imposed a new balance of power, proving himself a formidable strategist and warrior.

Throughout his three decades in North America, Champlain remained committed to a remarkable vision, a Grand Design for France's colony. He encouraged intermarriage among the French colonists and the natives, and he insisted on tolerance for Protestants. He was a visionary leader, especially when compared to his English and Spanish contemporaries — a man who dreamed of humanity and peace in a world of cruelty and violence.

This superb biography, the first in decades, is as dramatic and exciting as the life it portrays. Deeply researched, it is illustrated throughout with many contemporary images and maps, including several drawn by Champlain himself.
Download links
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Fastest Speed!

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




Champlain’s Dream

FREEDownload : Champlain’s Dream

Champlain's Dream by David Hackett Fischer
2009 | ISBN: 1416593330, 1416593322, 030739767X | English | 848 pages | EPUB | 18 MB

Champlain’s Dream
In this sweeping, enthralling biography, acclaimed historian David Hackett Fischer brings to life the remarkable Samuel de Champlain — soldier, spy, master mariner, explorer, cartographer, artist, and Father of New France.

Born on France's Atlantic coast, Champlain grew to manhood in a country riven by religious warfare. The historical record is unclear on whether Champlain was baptized Protestant or Catholic, but he fought in France's religious wars for the man who would become Henri IV, one of France's greatest kings, and like Henri, he was religiously tolerant in an age of murderous sectarianism. Champlain was also a brilliant navigator. He went to sea as a boy and over time acquired the skills that allowed him to make twenty-seven Atlantic crossings without losing a ship.

But we remember Champlain mainly as a great explorer. On foot and by ship and canoe, he traveled through what are now six Canadian provinces and five American states. Over more than thirty years he founded, colonized, and administered French settlements in North America. Sailing frequently between France and Canada, he maneuvered through court intrigue in Paris and negotiated among more than a dozen Indian nations in North America to establish New France. Champlain had early support from Henri IV and later Louis XIII, but the Queen Regent Marie de Medici and Cardinal Richelieu opposed his efforts. Despite much resistance and many defeats, Champlain, by his astonishing dedication and stamina, finally established France's New World colony. He tried constantly to maintain peace among Indian nations that were sometimes at war with one another, but when he had to, he took up arms and forcefully imposed a new balance of power, proving himself a formidable strategist and warrior.

Throughout his three decades in North America, Champlain remained committed to a remarkable vision, a Grand Design for France's colony. He encouraged intermarriage among the French colonists and the natives, and he insisted on tolerance for Protestants. He was a visionary leader, especially when compared to his English and Spanish contemporaries — a man who dreamed of humanity and peace in a world of cruelty and violence.

This superb biography, the first in decades, is as dramatic and exciting as the life it portrays. Deeply researched, it is illustrated throughout with many contemporary images and maps, including several drawn by Champlain himself.
Download links
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Fastest Speed!

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




The Lights that Failed: European International History 1919-1933 (Oxford History of Modern Europe)

The Lights that Failed: European International History 1919-1933 (Oxford History of Modern Europe) by Zara Steiner
English | 2005 | ISBN: 0198221142, 0199226865 | English | 960 pages | PDF | 4,7 MB
The peace treaties represented an almost impossible attempt to solve the problems caused by a murderous world war. In The Lights that Failed: European International History 1919-1933, part of the Oxford History of Modern Europe series, Steiner challenges the common assumption that the Treaty of Versailles led to the opening of a second European war.

In a radically original way, this book characterizes the 1920s not as a frustrated prelude to a second global conflict but as a fascinating decade in its own right, when politicians and diplomats strove to re-assemble a viable European order. Steiner examines the efforts that failed but also those which gave hope for future promise, many of which are usually underestimated, if not ignored. She shows that an equilibrium was achieved, attained between a partial American withdrawal from Europe and the self-imposed constraints which the Soviet system imposed on exporting revolution. The stabilization painfully achieved in Europe reached it fragile limits after 1925, even prior to the financial crises that engulfed the continent. The hinge years between the great crash of 1929 and Hitler's achievement of power in 1933 devastatingly altered the balance between nationalism and internationalism. This wide-ranging study helps us grasp the decisive stages in this process.

In a second volume, The Triumph of the Night , Steiner will examine the immediate lead up to the Second World War and its early years.

>>Visit my blog for more eBooks<< | And also can connect to RSS

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed