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Blood and Violence in Early Modern France

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Stuart Carroll "Blood and Violence in Early Modern France"
Oxford University Press | 2006-07-03 | ISBN: 0199290458 | 384 pages | PDF | 5 MB

Blood and Violence in Early Modern France
The rise of civilized conduct and behaviour has long been seen as one of the major factors in the transformation from medieval to modern society. Thinkers and historians alike argue that violence progressively declined as men learned to control their emotions. The feud is a phenomenon associated with backward societies, and in the West duelling codified behaviour and channelled aggression into ritualised combats that satisfied honour without the shedding of blood. French manners and codes of civility laid the foundations of civilized Western values. But as this original work of archival research shows we continue to romanticize violence in the era of the swashbuckling swordsman. In France, thousands of men died in duels in which the rules of the game were regularly flouted. Many duels were in fact mini-battles and must be seen not as a replacement of the blood feud, but as a continuation of vengeance-taking in a much bloodier form. This book outlines the nature of feuding in France and its intensification in the wake of the Protestant Reformation, civil war and dynastic weakness, and considers the solutions proposed by thinkers from Montaigne to Hobbes. The creation of the largest standing army in Europe since the Romans was one such solution, but the militarization of society, a model adopted throughout Europe, reveals the darker side of the civilizing process.
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Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures

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Bridges: The science and art of the world's most inspiring structures by David Blockley
English | 2010 | ISBN: 0199543593 | 329 Pages | PDF | 2 MB
The Brooklyn Bridge, London's Tower Bridge, Sydney's Harbour Bridge, San Francisco's Golden Gate–bridges can be breathtakingly monumental structures, magnificent works of art, and vital arteries that make life vastly easier.

Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures
In Bridges , eminent structural engineer David Blockley takes readers on a fascinating guided tour of bridge construction, ranging from the primitive rope bridges (now mainly found in adventure movies), to Roman aqueducts and the timber trestle railway bridges of the American West, to today's modern marvels, such as the Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge, which has the largest span in the world. Blockley outlines the forces at work on a bridge–tension, compression, and shear–and the basic structural elements that combat these forces–beams, arches, trusses, and suspensions (or BATS). As he does so, he explores some of the great bridges around the world, including such lesser-known masterpieces as the Forth Railway Bridge (featured in Alfred Hitchcock's The Thirty-Nine Steps ), and describes some spectacular failures, such as the recent bridge collapse in Minnesota or the famous failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in 1940. For instance, Blockley discusses the London's Millennium Bridge–the blade of light across the Thames–which displayed an alarming wobble when opened. He explains that when people walk, they not only exert force directly forward, but also exert a lesser force to the side, and the Millennium Bridge engineers did not consider this tiny lateral movement in their otherwise meticulous design. Amazingly enough, this minor omission caused a wobble severe enough to close the bridge for two years. Bridge building is a magnificent example of the practical use of science. But as Blockley shows in this illuminating book, engineers must go beyond science, blending technical experience and creativity to build the spans that connect us all.
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Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures

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Bridges: The science and art of the world's most inspiring structures by David Blockley
English | 2010 | ISBN: 0199543593 | 329 Pages | PDF | 2 MB
The Brooklyn Bridge, London's Tower Bridge, Sydney's Harbour Bridge, San Francisco's Golden Gate–bridges can be breathtakingly monumental structures, magnificent works of art, and vital arteries that make life vastly easier.

Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures
In Bridges , eminent structural engineer David Blockley takes readers on a fascinating guided tour of bridge construction, ranging from the primitive rope bridges (now mainly found in adventure movies), to Roman aqueducts and the timber trestle railway bridges of the American West, to today's modern marvels, such as the Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge, which has the largest span in the world. Blockley outlines the forces at work on a bridge–tension, compression, and shear–and the basic structural elements that combat these forces–beams, arches, trusses, and suspensions (or BATS). As he does so, he explores some of the great bridges around the world, including such lesser-known masterpieces as the Forth Railway Bridge (featured in Alfred Hitchcock's The Thirty-Nine Steps ), and describes some spectacular failures, such as the recent bridge collapse in Minnesota or the famous failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in 1940. For instance, Blockley discusses the London's Millennium Bridge–the blade of light across the Thames–which displayed an alarming wobble when opened. He explains that when people walk, they not only exert force directly forward, but also exert a lesser force to the side, and the Millennium Bridge engineers did not consider this tiny lateral movement in their otherwise meticulous design. Amazingly enough, this minor omission caused a wobble severe enough to close the bridge for two years. Bridge building is a magnificent example of the practical use of science. But as Blockley shows in this illuminating book, engineers must go beyond science, blending technical experience and creativity to build the spans that connect us all.
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Buddhist Hagiography in Early Japan: Images of Compassion in the Gyoki Tradition

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Buddhist Hagiography in Early Japan: Images of Compassion in the Gyoki Tradition By Jonathan Morris Augustine
Publisher: Routle..dge 2005 | 184 Pages | ISBN: 0415322456 | PDF | 2 MB

Buddhist Hagiography in Early Japan: Images of Compassion in the Gyoki Tradition
Hagiographies or idealized biographies which recount the lives of saints, bodhisattvas and other charismatic figures have been the meeting place for myth and experience. In medieval Europe, the 'lives of saints' were read during liturgical celebrations and the texts themselves were treated as sacred objects. In Japan, it was believed that those who read the biographies of lofty monks would acquire merit. Since hagiographies were written or compiled by 'believers', the line between fantasy and reality was often obscured. This study of the bodhisattva Gyoki – regarded as the monk who started the largest social welfare movement in Japan – illustrates how Japanese Buddhist hagiographers chose to regard a single monk's charitable activities as a miraculous achievement that shaped the course of Japanese history.
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38 Nooses: Lincoln, Little Crow, and the Beginning of the Frontier’s End

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Scott W. Berg, "38 Nooses: Lincoln, Little Crow, and the Beginning of the Frontier's End"
English | ISBN: 0307377245 | 2012 | EPUB | 384 pages | 5 MB

38 Nooses: Lincoln, Little Crow, and the Beginning of the Frontier’s End
In August 1862, after decades of broken treaties, increasing hardship, and relentless encroachment on their lands, a group of Dakota warriors convened a council at the tepee of their leader, Little Crow. Knowing the strength and resilience of the young American nation, Little Crow counseled caution, but anger won the day. Forced to either lead his warriors in a war he knew they could not win or leave them to their fates, he declared, "[Little Crow] is not a coward: he will die with you."

So began six weeks of intense conflict along the Minnesota frontier as the Dakotas clashed with settlers and federal troops, all the while searching for allies in their struggle. Once the uprising was smashed and the Dakotas captured, a military commission was convened, which quickly found more than three hundred Indians guilty of murder. President Lincoln, embroiled in the most devastating period of the Civil War, personally intervened in order to spare the lives of 265 of the condemned men, but the toll on the Dakota nation was still staggering: a way of life destroyed, a tribe forcibly relocated to barren and unfamiliar territory, and 38 Dakota warriors hanged-the largest government-sanctioned execution in American history.

Scott W. Berg recounts the conflict through the stories of several remarkable characters, including Little Crow, who foresaw how ruinous the conflict would be for his tribe; Sarah Wakefield, who had been captured by the Dakotas, then vilified as an "Indian lover" when she defended them; Minnesota bishop Henry Benjamin Whipple, who was a tireless advocate for the Indians' cause; and Lincoln, who transcended his own family history to pursue justice.

Written with uncommon immediacy and insight, 38 Nooses details these events within the larger context of the Civil War, the history of the Dakota people, and the subsequent United States-Indian wars. It is a revelation of an overlooked but seminal moment in American history.
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Fraud Fighter: My Fables and Foibles

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Fraud Fighter: My Fables and Foibles
by Joseph T. Wells
English | 2011 | ISBN: 0470610700 | 329 pages | PDF | 4.09 MB

Fraud Fighter: My Fables and Foibles
"A collection of insightful, poignant, and humorous stories from Dr. Joseph Wells, the world's foremost fraud expert?with gutsy revelations of his own past mistakes
From his dysfunctional childhood in rural Oklahoma; his service in the U.S.Navy; a brief stint in public accounting followed by a career in the FBI; and founding the world's largest anti-fraud organization, Wells' colorful life experiences were preparation for his rise to one of the globe's most revered antifraud experts.

Written by the preeminent antifraud authority and founder and Chairman of the ACFE
Offers a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at the life of one of the most influential white-collar crime experts of our time
At a period when dishonesty at top U.S. companies is dominating public attention, The Fables and Foibles of a Fraud Fighter is a surprisingly frank and gripping memoir from an unsurprisingly effective fraud fighter.This autobiography forms a full tapestry of a life, displaying wit, intrigue, trepidation, regret, and finally, ultimate victory."
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The Regal Way: The Life and Times of Rabbi Israel of Ruzhin

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The Regal Way: The Life and Times of Rabbi Israel of Ruzhin (Stanford Studies in Jewish History and C) by David Assaf
English | June 19, 2002 | ISBN-10: 0804744688 | 480 pages | PDF | 3,4 MB

The Regal Way: The Life and Times of Rabbi Israel of Ruzhin
This is a pioneering study of the nineteenth century Hasidic movement as shown through the life of one of the most controversial and influential Hasidic leaders, Rabbi Israel Friedman of Ruzhin (1796-1850).

The dramatic episodes of his life-including his involvement in the murder of Jewish informers, his imprisonment in Russia, his subsequent escape to Austria where he successfully reestablished his court-are echoed by the contradictory and highly critical opinions of his personal character and his role as leader of one of the largest and most opulent Hasidic courts of the nineteenth century.
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