Tag Archives: Missionary

Significance of Yavneh & Other Essays in Jewish Hellenism

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Shaye J. D. Cohen, "Significance of Yavneh & Other Essays in Jewish Hellenism"
English | ISBN: 3161503759 | 2010 | 629 pages | PDF | 4 MB

Significance of Yavneh & Other Essays in Jewish Hellenism
This volume collects thirty essays by Shaye J.D. Cohen. First published between 1980 and 2006, these essays deal with a wide variety of themes and texts: Jewish Hellenism; Josephus; the Synagogue; Conversion to Judaism; Blood and Impurity; the boundary between Judaism and Christianity. What unites them is their philological orientation. Many of these essays are close studies of obscure passages in Jewish and Christian texts.
The essays are united too by their common assumption that the ancient world was a single cultural continuum; that ancient Judaism, in all its expressions and varieties, was a Hellenism; and that texts written in Hebrew share a world of discourse with those written in Greek. Many of these essays are well-known and have been much discussed in contemporary scholarship. Among these are: "The Significance of Yavneh" (the title essay), "Patriarchs and Scholarchs," "Masada: Literary Tradition, Archaeological Remains, and the Credibility of Josephus," "Epigraphical Rabbis," "The Conversion of Antoninus," "Menstruants and the Sacred in Judaism and Christianity," and "A Brief History of Jewish Circumcision Blood."
Survey of contents:
Jewish Hellenism The Beauty of Flora and the Beauty of Sarai – Sosates the Jewish Homer – The Destruction: From Scripture to Midrash – The Significance of Yavneh – Patriarchs and Scholarchs – False Prophets (4Q339), Netinim (4Q340), and Hellenism at Qumran
Josephus Josephus, Jeremiah, and Polybius – History and Historiography in the Against Apion of Josephus – Masada: Literary Tradition, Archaeological Remains, and the Credibility of Josephus – Parallel Historical Tradition in Josephus and Rabbinic Literature – Alexander the Great and Jaddus the High Priest According to Josephus – Respect for Judaism by Gentiles in the Writings of Josephus – Ioudaios to genos and Related Expressions in Josephus
Synagogues and Rabbis Epigraphical Rabbis – Pagan and Christian Evidence on the Ancient Synagogue – Were Pharisees and Rabbis the Leaders of Communal Prayer and Torah Study in Antiquity? The Evidence of the New Testament, Josephus, and the Early Church Fathers – The Place of the Rabbi in the Jewish Society of the Second Century
Conversion and Intermarriage Was Judaism in Antiquity a Missionary Religion? – Adolf Harnack's The Mission and Expansion of Judaism: Christianity Succeeds where Judaism Fails – Is `Proselyte Baptism' Mentioned in the Mishnah? The Interpretation of M. Pesahim 8:8 – The Conversion of Antoninus – On Murdering or Injuring a Proselyte – Solomon and the Daughter of Pharaoh: Intermarriage, Conversion, and the Impurity of Women
Women and Blood Menstruants and the Sacred in Judaism and Christianity – Purity, Piety, and Polemic: Medieval Rabbinic Denunciations of `Incorrect' Purification Practices – A Brief History of Jewish Circumcision Blood
Judaism and Christianity Judaism without Circumcision and `Judaism' without `Circumcision' in Ignatius – Between Judaism and Christianity: the Semi-Circumcision of Christians According to Bernard Gui, his Sources, and R. Eliezer of Metz – Does Rashi's Torah Commentary Respond to Christianity? A Comparison of Rashi with Rashbam and Bekhor Shor – A Virgin Defiled: Some Rabbinic and Christian Views on the Origins of Heresy
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The Pariah Problem: Caste, Religion, and the Social in Modern India

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The Pariah Problem: Caste, Religion, and the Social in Modern India by Rupa Viswanath
English | 2014 | ISBN: 0231163061 | 416 pages | EPUB | 17 MB

The Pariah Problem: Caste, Religion, and the Social in Modern India
Once known as "Pariahs," Dalits are primarily descendants of unfree agrarian laborers. They belong to India's most subordinated castes, face overwhelming poverty and discrimination, and provoke public anxiety. Drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, this book follows the conception and evolution of the "Pariah Problem" in public consciousness in the 1890s. It shows how high-caste landlords, state officials, and well-intentioned missionaries conceived of Dalit oppression, and effectively foreclosed the emergence of substantive solutions to the "Problem" — with consequences that continue to be felt today.

Rupa Viswanath begins with a description of the everyday lives of Dalit laborers in the 1890s and highlights the systematic efforts made by the state and Indian elites to protect Indian slavery from public scrutiny. Protestant missionaries were the first non-Dalits to draw attention to their plight. The missionaries' vision of the Pariahs' suffering as being a result of Hindu religious prejudice, however, obscured the fact that the entire agrarian political–economic system depended on unfree Pariah labor. Both the Indian public and colonial officials came to share a view compatible with missionary explanations, which meant all subsequent welfare efforts directed at Dalits focused on religious and social transformation rather than on structural reform. Methodologically, theoretically, and empirically, this book breaks new ground to demonstrate how events in the early decades of state-sponsored welfare directed at Dalits laid the groundwork for the present day, where the postcolonial state and well-meaning social and religious reformers continue to downplay Dalits' landlessness, violent suppression, and political subordination.

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The Pariah Problem: Caste, Religion, and the Social in Modern India

FREEDownload : The Pariah Problem: Caste, Religion, and the Social in Modern India

The Pariah Problem: Caste, Religion, and the Social in Modern India by Rupa Viswanath
English | 2014 | ISBN: 0231163061 | 416 pages | EPUB | 17 MB

The Pariah Problem: Caste, Religion, and the Social in Modern India
Once known as "Pariahs," Dalits are primarily descendants of unfree agrarian laborers. They belong to India's most subordinated castes, face overwhelming poverty and discrimination, and provoke public anxiety. Drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, this book follows the conception and evolution of the "Pariah Problem" in public consciousness in the 1890s. It shows how high-caste landlords, state officials, and well-intentioned missionaries conceived of Dalit oppression, and effectively foreclosed the emergence of substantive solutions to the "Problem" — with consequences that continue to be felt today.

Rupa Viswanath begins with a description of the everyday lives of Dalit laborers in the 1890s and highlights the systematic efforts made by the state and Indian elites to protect Indian slavery from public scrutiny. Protestant missionaries were the first non-Dalits to draw attention to their plight. The missionaries' vision of the Pariahs' suffering as being a result of Hindu religious prejudice, however, obscured the fact that the entire agrarian political–economic system depended on unfree Pariah labor. Both the Indian public and colonial officials came to share a view compatible with missionary explanations, which meant all subsequent welfare efforts directed at Dalits focused on religious and social transformation rather than on structural reform. Methodologically, theoretically, and empirically, this book breaks new ground to demonstrate how events in the early decades of state-sponsored welfare directed at Dalits laid the groundwork for the present day, where the postcolonial state and well-meaning social and religious reformers continue to downplay Dalits' landlessness, violent suppression, and political subordination.

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Performing Marx: Contemporary Negotiations of a Living Tradition

Bradley J. Macdonald – Performing Marx: Contemporary Negotiations of a Living Tradition
Published: 2006-03-01 | ISBN: 0791466655, 0791466663 | PDF | 226 pages | 3 MB

Performing Marx looks at what it means to be a Marxist dealing with contemporary political and theoretical developments in the twenty-first century. Drawing upon Marx’s work, Western Marxism, and poststructuralist theory, Bradley J. Macdonald explores how a living tradition of Marx’s ideas can constructively engage a politics of desire and pleasure, ecological sustainability, a politics of everyday life that takes seriously popular culture, and the nature of globalization and of the radical forces being arrayed against the logics of global capitalism. By engaging such crucial issues, Macdonald also provides important clarifications of the work of William Morris, Guy Debord and the situationists, Michel Foucault, Antonio Negri, Ernesto Laclau, and Chantal Mouffe, as they relate to Marx.

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Biblical Argument in Manichaean Missionary Practice (Nag Hammadi and Manichaean Studies)

Berg, "Biblical Argument in Manichaean Missionary Practice (Nag Hammadi and Manichaean Studies)"
English | ISBN: 9004180346 | 2010 | PDF | 244 pages | 3.9 MB
The use and appreciation of Scripture by the Manichaeans is a field of research with many unanswered questions. This study offers an investigation into the role of the Bible in the writings of the important Manichaean missionary Addas Adimantus (flor. ca. 250 CE), one of Mani's first disciples.

A major part of the book is dedicated to the reconstruction of the contents of his Disputationes, in which writing Adimantus attempted to demonstrate that the Old and New Testaments are absolutely irreconcilable. The most important source in this connection is Augustine, who refuted a Latin translation of Adimantus' work. A thorough analysis of the contents of the Disputationes brings to the fore that Adimantus was a Marcionite prior to his going over to Mani's church.

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