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Battlefield Medicine: A History of the Military Ambulance from the Napoleonic Wars Through World War I

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Battlefield Medicine: A History of the Military Ambulance from the Napoleonic Wars Through World War I by John S. Haller Jr.
2011 | ISBN: 0809330407 | English | 288 pages | PDF | 10 MB

Battlefield Medicine: A History of the Military Ambulance from the Napoleonic Wars Through World War I
In this first history of the military ambulance, historian John S. Haller Jr. documents the development of medical technologies for treating and transporting wounded soldiers on the battlefield. Noting that the word ambulance has been used to refer to both a mobile medical support system and a mode of transport, Haller takes readers back to the origins of the modern ambulance, covering their evolution in depth from the late eighteenth century through World War I.

The rising nationalism, economic and imperial competition, and military alliances and arms races of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries figure prominently in this history of the military ambulance, which focuses mainly on British and American technological advancements. Beginning with changes introduced by Dominique-Jean Larrey during the Napoleonic Wars, the book traces the organizational and technological challenges faced by opposing armies in the Crimean War, the American Civil War, the Franco-Prussian War, and the Philippines Insurrection, then climaxes with the trench warfare that defined World War I. The operative word is "challenges" of medical care and evacuation because while some things learned in a conflict are carried into the next, too often, the spasms of war force its participants to repeat the errors of the past before acquiring much needed insight.

More than a history of medical evacuation systems and vehicles, this exhaustively researched and richly illustrated volume tells a fascinating story, giving readers a unique perspective of the changing nature of warfare in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
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The New Inquisition: Irrational Rationalism and the Citadel of Science

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The New Inquisition: Irrational Rationalism and the Citadel of Science By Robert A. Wilson
1987 | 240 Pages | ISBN: 0941404498 , 1561840025 | scanned PDF | 60 MB

The New Inquisition: Irrational Rationalism and the Citadel of Science
The New Inquisition dares to confront the disease of our time; Fundamentalist Materialism. Wilson explains, "I am opposing the Fundamentalism, not the Materialism. This book…is deliberately shocking because I do not want its ideas to seem any less stark or startling than they are".
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God and Race in American Politics: A Short History

Mark A. Noll – God and Race in American Politics: A Short History
Published: 2008-08-18 | ISBN: 0691125368, 0691146292 | PDF | 224 pages | 3 MB

Religion has been a powerful political force throughout American history. When race enters the mix the results have been some of our greatest triumphs as a nation–and some of our most shameful failures. In this important book, Mark Noll, one of the most influential historians of American religion writing today, traces the explosive political effects of the religious intermingling with race.
Noll demonstrates how supporters and opponents of slavery and segregation drew equally on the Bible to justify the morality of their positions. He shows how a common evangelical heritage supported Jim Crow discrimination and contributed powerfully to the black theology of liberation preached by Martin Luther King Jr. In probing such connections, Noll takes readers from the 1830 slave revolt of Nat Turner through Reconstruction and the long Jim Crow era, from the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s to "values" voting in recent presidential elections. He argues that the greatest transformations in American political history, from the Civil War through the civil rights revolution and beyond, constitute an interconnected narrative in which opposing appeals to Biblical truth gave rise to often-contradictory religious and moral complexities. And he shows how this heritage remains alive today in controversies surrounding stem-cell research and abortion as well as civil rights reform.
God and Race in American Politics is a panoramic history that reveals the profound role of religion in American political history and in American discourse on race and social justice.

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