Tag Archives: piracy,

Security in Computing, 4th Edition

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Security in Computing, 4th Edition by Charles P. Pfleeger, Shari Lawrence Pfleeger
2006 | ISBN: 0132390779 | English | 880 pages | EPUB | 7 MB

Security in Computing, 4th Edition
The New State-of-the-Art in Information Security: Now Covers the Economics of Cyber Security and the Intersection of Privacy and Information Security
For years, IT and security professionals and students have turned to Security in Computing as the definitive guide to information about computer security attacks and countermeasures. In their new fourth edition, Charles P. Pfleeger and Shari Lawrence Pfleeger have thoroughly updated their classic guide to reflect today's newest technologies, standards, and trends.
The authors first introduce the core concepts and vocabulary of computer security, including attacks and controls. Next, the authors systematically identify and assess threats now facing programs, operating systems, database systems, and networks. For each threat, they offer best-practice responses.

Security in Computing, Fourth Edition , goes beyond technology, covering crucial management issues faced in protecting infrastructure and information. This edition contains an all-new chapter on the economics of cybersecurity, explaining ways to make a business case for security investments. Another new chapter addresses privacy–from data mining and identity theft, to RFID and e-voting.

New coverage also includes
Programming mistakes that compromise security: man-in-the-middle, timing, and privilege escalation attacks
Web application threats and vulnerabilities
Networks of compromised systems: bots, botnets, and drones
Rootkits–including the notorious Sony XCP
Wi-Fi network security challenges, standards, and techniques
New malicious code attacks, including false interfaces and keystroke loggers
Improving code quality: software engineering, testing, and liability approaches
Biometric authentication: capabilities and limitations
Using the Advanced Encryption System (AES) more effectively
Balancing dissemination with piracy control in music and other digital content
Countering new cryptanalytic attacks against RSA, DES, and SHA
Responding to the emergence of organized attacker groups pursuing profit
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The Pirates’ Pact: The Secret Alliances Between History’s Most Notorious Buccaneers and Colonial America

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Douglas R. Burgess, "The Pirates' Pact: The Secret Alliances Between History's Most Notorious Buccaneers and Colonial America"
English | 2008 | ISBN-10: 0071474765 | EPUB, PDF | 288 pages | 3 MB

The Pirates’ Pact: The Secret Alliances Between History’s Most Notorious Buccaneers and Colonial America
Was classical piracy an earlier version of state-sponsored terrorism?
Here's the story of how almost every well-known buccaneer of the "Golden Age of Piracy" enjoyed active sponsorship from England's governors in the American colonies- setting a pattern of official disobedience to the Crown that would ultimately contribute to the American push for independence. Relying on rare primary sources discovered in government archives in England, the Carolinas, Rhode Island, Jamaica, and elsewhere, Burgess combines true tales of derring-do with groundbreaking research in this fascinating history.
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1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half

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Stephen R. Bown, "1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half"
English | 2012-02-14 | ISBN: 0312616120, 1553655567 | 304 pages | EPUB, MOBI | 5 MB

1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half
In 1494, award-winning author Stephen R. Bown tells the untold story of the explosive feud between monarchs, clergy, and explorers that split the globe between Spain and Portugal and made the world's oceans a battleground.

When Columbus triumphantly returned from America to Spain in 1493, his discoveries inflamed an already-smouldering conflict between Spain's renowned monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, and Portugal's João II. Which nation was to control the world's oceans? To quell the argument, Pope Alexander VI-the notorious Rodrigo Borgia-issued a proclamation laying the foundation for the Treaty of Tordesillas of 1494, an edict that created an imaginary line in the Atlantic Ocean dividing the entire known (and unknown) world between Spain and Portugal.

Just as the world's oceans were about to be opened by Columbus's epochal voyage, the treaty sought to limit the seas to these two favored Catholic nations. The edict was to have a profound influence on world history: it propelled Spain and Portugal to superpower status, steered many other European nations on a collision course, and became the central grievance in two centuries of international espionage, piracy, and warfare.

The treaty also began the fight for "the freedom of the seas"-the epic struggle to determine whether the world's oceans, and thus global commerce, would be controlled by the decree of an autocrat or be open to the ships of any nation-a distinctly modern notion, championed in the early seventeenth century by the Dutch legal theorist Hugo Grotius, whose arguments became the foundation of international law.

At the heart of one of the greatest international diplomatic and political agreements of the last five centuries were the strained relationships and passions of a handful of powerful individuals. They were linked by a shared history, mutual animosity, and personal obligations-quarrels, rivalries, and hatreds that dated back decades. Yet the struggle ultimately stemmed from a young woman's determination to defy tradition and the king, and to choose her own husband.
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