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The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Warfare

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The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Warfare by DK Publishing
English | 2012 | ISBN: 0756695481 | 512 pages | PDF | 64 MB

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Warfare
The most wide-ranging and visually arresting history of wars and warfare ever published, War: Definitive Visual Guide documents every major war or significant period of conflict in over 5,000 years of human history.

A must-have reference gift for military enthusiasts and general readers alike, no other book about warfare contains such a diverse selection of imagery including contemporary paintings and photographs, objects and artifacts, and specially commissioned artworks, maps, and diagrams.

War: Definitive Visual Guide includes a comprehensive directory of every major war, thematic spreads examining broader topics within the history of warfare, from the role of mercenaries, communications, and the treatment of wounded soldiers, and personal accounts and objects from soldiers and civilians that bring to life the human experience of battle.

From the earliest known Wars in Sumeria and Ancient Egypt War to the occupation of Iraq, War: Definitive Visual Guide combines a coherent and compelling spread-by-spread historical narrative with a wealth of supporting features to recount the epic 5,000-year story of warfare and combat through the ages.
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The Autobiography of Jamgon Kongtrul: A Gem of Many Colors

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The Autobiography of Jamgon Kongtrul: A Gem of Many Colors by Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Taye
English | Feb 10, 2003 | ISBN: 1559391847 | 544 Pages | PDF | 2 MB
Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Taye (1813-1899) was one of the most influential figures and prolific writers in the Tibetan Buddhist world. He was a founder and the single most important proponent of the nonsectarian movement that flourished in eastern Tibet and remains popular today.

The Autobiography of Jamgon Kongtrul: A Gem of Many Colors
Two additional texts discuss his previous lives and recount Kongtrul's final days. The Autobiography of Jamgön Kongtrul is part of The Tsadra Foundation Series published by Snow Lion Publications.
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TTC How We Learn (Audiobook)

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TTC How We Learn (Audiobook)
English | MP3 128 kbps | 24 Lectures | 361 MB
Learning is a lifelong adventure. It starts in your mother's womb, accelerates to high speed in infancy and childhood, and continues through every age, whether you're actively engaged in mastering a new skill, intuitively discovering an unfamiliar place, or just sleeping, which is fundamental to helping you consolidate and hold on to what you've learned. You are truly born to learn around the clock.

TTC How We Learn (Audiobook)
But few of us know how we learn, which is the key to learning and studying more effectively. For example, you may be surprised by the following:

People tend to misjudge what they have learned well, what they don't yet know, and what they do and do not need to practice.
Moments of confusion, frustration, uncertainty, and lack of confidence are part of the process of acquiring new skills and new knowledge.
Humans and animals explore their worlds for the sake of learning, regardless of rewards and punishment connected with success.
You can teach an old dog new tricks. In fact, older learners have the benefit of prior knowledge and critical skills—two advantages in learning.
Shedding light on what's going on when we learn and dispelling common myths about the subject, How We Learn introduces you to this practical and accessible science in 24 half-hour lectures presented by Professor Monisha Pasupathi of the University of Utah, an award-winning psychology teacher and expert on how people of all ages learn.

A Course about You

Customers of The Great Courses are already devoted to lifelong learning and may be surprised at how complicated the process of learning is. We have a single word for it—learn—but it occurs in a fascinating variety of ways, which Professor Pasupathi recounts in detail. She describes a wide range of experiments that may strike a familiar chord as you recognize something about yourself or others:

scripts: We have trouble recalling specific events until we have first learned scripts for those events. Young children are prodigious learners of scripts, but so are first-time parents, college freshmen, foreign travelers, and new employees.
Variable ratio reinforcement: Children whining for candy are usually refused, but the few occasions when parents give in encourage maximal display of the behavior. The same principle is behind the success of slot machines and other unpredictable rewards.
Storytelling: Telling stories is fundamentally an act of learning about ourselves. The way we recount experiences, usually shortly after the event, has lasting effects on the way we remember those experiences and what we learn from them.
Sleeper effect: Have you ever heard something from an unreliable source and later found yourself believing it? Over time, we tend to remember information but forget the source. Paradoxically, this effect is stronger when the source is less credible.
Dr. Pasupathi's many examples cover the modern history of research on learning—from behaviorist theory in the early 20th century to the most recent debates about whether IQ can be separated from achievement, or whether a spectrum of different learning styles and multiple intelligences really exist.

What You Will Learn

You start by examining 10 myths about learning. These can get in the way of making the fullest use of the extraordinary capacity for learning and include widespread beliefs, such as that college-educated people already know how to maximize learning or that a person must be interested in a subject in order to learn it.

Professor Pasupathi then covers mistaken theories of learning, such as that lab animals and humans learn in the same way or that the brain is a tabula rasa, a blank slate that can absorb information without preparation. Babies might seem to be a counterexample, showing that you can learn from scratch. However, you examine what newborns must know at birth in order for them to learn so much, so quickly.

Next you explore in depth how humans master different tasks, from learning a native language or a second language, to becoming adept at a sport or a musical instrument, to learning a new city or a problem-solving strategy, to grasping the distinctive style of thinking required in mathematics and science. Then you look inside the learning process itself, where many factors come into play, including what is being learned and the context, along with the emotions, motivations, and goals of the learner. You close by considering individual differences. Some people seem to learn without effort. How do they do it?

Tips on Learning

Along the way, Professor Pasupathi offers frequent advice on how to excel in many different learning situations:

Mastering material: Testing yourself is a very effective strategy for mastering difficult material. Try taking a blank sheet of paper and writing down everything you can recall about the subject. Then go back and review the material. Next, try another blank sheet of paper.
Second-language learning: Becoming fluent in a second language in adulthood is difficult because your brain is tuned to your native language and misses important clues in the new language. To overcome this obstacle, immerse yourself among native speakers of the new language.
Motivating a child: When trying to motivate a schoolchild to learn, avoid controlling language, create opportunities to give the child a sense of choice, and be careful about excessive praise and other forms of rewards, which can actually undermine learning.
Maintaining a learning edge: Middle-aged and older adults can preserve their learning aptitude by exercising to maintain cardiovascular health, staying mentally active, and periodically trying a new challenge, such as learning to draw or studying new dance steps.
Adventures in Learning

Winner of prestigious teaching awards from her university's chapter of Psi Chi, the National Honor Society in Psychology, Dr. Pasupathi brings today's exciting field of learning research alive. Her descriptions of ongoing work in her field, in which she is a prominent participant, are vivid and insightful, allowing you to put yourself into a given experiment and ask, "How would I react under these circumstances? What does this tell me about my own approach to learning?"

By the time How We Learn ends, you will appreciate the incredible breadth of what we learn in our lifetimes, understand the commonality and diversity of human learning experiences, and come away with strategies for enhancing your own adventures in learning.

"Learning is a human birthright," says Professor Pasupathi. "Everything about us is built for lifelong learning—from our unusually long childhood and our large prefrontal cortex to our interest in novelty and challenge." And she finds reason for optimism about the future of humanity due to our almost miraculous capacity to learn.

About Your Professor

Dr. Monisha Pasupathi is Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Utah. She holds a Ph.D. in Psychology from Stanford University. She joined the faculty at Utah in 1999 after completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Germany.

Professor Pasupathi has been honored multiple times for her teaching. She was named Best Psychology Professor by her university's chapter of Psi Chi, the National Honor Society in Psychology. Psi Chi also awarded her the Outstanding Educator Award and Favorite Professor Award.

Professor Pasupathi's research focuses on how people of all ages learn from their experiences, particularly through storytelling. She is coeditor of Narrative Development in Adolescence: Creating the Storied Self, and her work has been published widely in scholarly journals.

Directory of TTC Teaching Company – How We Learn 2012

01 Myths about Learning.mp3
02 Why No Single Learning Theory Works.mp3
03 Learning as Information Processing.mp3
04 Creating Representations.mp3
05 Categories, Rules, and scripts.mp3
06 What Babies Know.mp3
07 Learning Your Native Tongue.mp3
08 Learning a Second Language.mp3
09 Learning How to Move.mp3
10 Learning Our Way Around.mp3
11 Learning to Tell Stories.mp3
12 Learning Approaches in Math and Science.mp3
13 Learning as Theory Testing.mp3
14 Integrating Different Domains of Learning.mp3
15 Cognitive Constraints on Learning.mp3
16 Choosing Learning Strategies.mp3
17 Source Knowledge and Learning.mp3
18 The Role of Emotion in Learning.mp3
19 Cultivating a Desire to Learn.mp3
20 Intelligence and Learning.mp3
21 Are Learning Styles Real.mp3
22 Different People, Different Interests.mp3
23 Learning across the Lifespan.mp3
24 Making the Most of How We Learn.mp3
How We Learn.txt

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Buddhist Hagiography in Early Japan: Images of Compassion in the Gyoki Tradition

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Buddhist Hagiography in Early Japan: Images of Compassion in the Gyoki Tradition By Jonathan Morris Augustine
Publisher: Routle..dge 2005 | 184 Pages | ISBN: 0415322456 | PDF | 2 MB

Buddhist Hagiography in Early Japan: Images of Compassion in the Gyoki Tradition
Hagiographies or idealized biographies which recount the lives of saints, bodhisattvas and other charismatic figures have been the meeting place for myth and experience. In medieval Europe, the 'lives of saints' were read during liturgical celebrations and the texts themselves were treated as sacred objects. In Japan, it was believed that those who read the biographies of lofty monks would acquire merit. Since hagiographies were written or compiled by 'believers', the line between fantasy and reality was often obscured. This study of the bodhisattva Gyoki – regarded as the monk who started the largest social welfare movement in Japan – illustrates how Japanese Buddhist hagiographers chose to regard a single monk's charitable activities as a miraculous achievement that shaped the course of Japanese history.
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City of Oranges: Arabs and Jews in Jaffa

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Adam LeBor, "City of Oranges: Arabs and Jews in Jaffa"
English | ISBN: 0747573662 | 2006 | EPUB | 384 pages | 5,2 MB

City of Oranges: Arabs and Jews in Jaffa
Through the eyes of these families from Jaffa we understand how the founding of the state of Israel could be simultaneously a moment of jubilation for the Jews, and a disaster – the Naqba – for the 100,000 Arabs who fled Jaffa in 1948, most of them never to return. Jaffa was for centuries the main port of the eastern Mediterranean, home to Muslims, Christians and Jews, while the produce of its orange groves was famed throughout the world. From 1920 the British administered the city under the Mandate and it is in 1920 that Adam LeBor's ambitious and engaging new book begins to tell the history of Israel through the prism of Jaffa. Its inhabitants include the Jewish coffee and spice merchant, the Arab baker who made bread for the whole community, the Palestinian exile who tried to bring modern business methods to the Arafat era and the Jewish schoolgirl who befriended an Arab drug dealer. In this ground-breaking book Adam LeBor goes beyond the media stereotypes to recount a moving human story of a country born of conflict.
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Greek Gods & Goddesses

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Greek Gods & Goddesses by Britannica Educational Publishing, Michael Taft
English | 2014 | eISBN: 1622751531 | eISBN-13: 9781622751532 | 130 pages | PDF | 7 MB
Greek mythology is the body of stories concerning the gods, heroes, and rituals of the ancient Greeks. That the myths contained a considerable element of fiction was recognized by the more critical Greeks, such as the philosopher Plato in the 5th-4th centuries BCE.

Greek Gods & Goddesses
In general, however, in the popular piety of the Greeks, the myths were viewed as true accounts. Greek mythology has subsequently had extensive influence on the arts and literature of Western civilization, which fell heir to much of Greek culture.

Although people of all countries, eras, and stages of civilization have developed myths that explain the existence and workings of natural phenomena, recount the deeds of gods or heroes, or seek to justify social or political institutions, the myths of the Greeks have remained unrivaled in the Western world as sources of imaginative and appealing ideas. Poets and artists from ancient times to the present have derived inspiration from Greek mythology and have discovered contemporary significance and relevance in Classical mythological themes.
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DNA: A Graphic Guide to the Molecule that Shook the World

Israel Rosenfield, Edward Ziff, Borin Van Loon – DNA: A Graphic Guide to the Molecule that Shook the World
Published: 2011-02-02 | ISBN: 0231142706, 0231142714 | PDF | 272 pages | 32 MB

With humor, depth, and philosophical and historical insight, DNA reaches out to a wide range of readers with its graphic portrayal of a complicated science. Suitable for use in and out of the classroom, this volume covers DNA's many marvels, from its original discovery in 1869 to early-twentieth-century debates on the mechanisms of inheritance and the deeper nature of life's evolution and variety.
Even readers who lack a background in science and philosophy will learn a tremendous amount from this engaging narrative. The book elucidates DNA's relationship to health and the cause and cure of disease. It also covers the creation of new life forms, nanomachines, and perspectives on crime detection, and considers the philosophical sources of classical Darwinian theory and recent, radical changes in the understanding of evolution itself. Already these developments have profoundly affected our notions about living things. Borin Van Loon's humorous illustrations recount the contributions of Gregor Mendel, Frederick Griffith, James Watson, and Francis Crick, among other biologists, scientists, and researchers, and vividly depict the modern controversies surrounding the Human Genome Project and cloning.

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