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Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle

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Andrea Hiott, "Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle"
English | ISBN: 0345521420 | 2012 | EPUB | 512 pages | 7 MB

Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle
Sometimes achieving big things requires the ability to think small. This simple concept was the driving force that propelled the Volkswagen Beetle to become an avatar of American-style freedom, a household brand, and a global icon. The VW Bug inspired the ad men of Madison Avenue, beguiled Woodstock Nation, and has recently been re-imagined for the hipster generation. And while today it is surely one of the most recognizable cars in the world, few of us know the compelling details of this car's story. In Thinking Small, journalist and cultural historian Andrea Hiott retraces the improbable journey of this little car that changed the world.

Andrea Hiott's wide-ranging narrative stretches from the factory floors of Weimar Germany to the executive suites of today's automotive innovators, showing how a succession of artists and engineers shepherded the Beetle to market through periods of privation and war, reconstruction and recovery. Henry Ford's Model T may have revolutionized the American auto industry, but for years Europe remained a place where only the elite drove cars. That all changed with the advent of the Volkswagen, the product of a Nazi initiative to bring driving to the masses. But Hitler's concept of "the people's car" would soon take on new meaning. As Germany rebuilt from the rubble of World War II, a whole generation succumbed to the charms of the world's most huggable automobile.

Indeed, the story of the Volkswagen is a story about people, and Hiott introduces us to the men who believed in it, built it, and sold it: Ferdinand Porsche, the visionary Austrian automobile designer whose futuristic dream of an affordable family vehicle was fatally compromised by his patron Adolf Hitler's monomaniacal drive toward war; Heinrich Nordhoff, the forward-thinking German industrialist whose management innovations made mass production of the Beetle a reality; and Bill Bernbach, the Jewish American advertising executive whose team of Madison Avenue mavericks dreamed up the legendary ad campaign that transformed the quintessential German compact into an outsize worldwide phenomenon.

Thinking Small is the remarkable story of an automobile and an idea. Hatched in an age of darkness, the Beetle emerged into the light of a new era as a symbol of individuality and personal mobility-a triumph not of the will but of the imagination.
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Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle

FREEDownload : Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle

Andrea Hiott, "Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle"
English | ISBN: 0345521420 | 2012 | EPUB | 512 pages | 7 MB

Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle
Sometimes achieving big things requires the ability to think small. This simple concept was the driving force that propelled the Volkswagen Beetle to become an avatar of American-style freedom, a household brand, and a global icon. The VW Bug inspired the ad men of Madison Avenue, beguiled Woodstock Nation, and has recently been re-imagined for the hipster generation. And while today it is surely one of the most recognizable cars in the world, few of us know the compelling details of this car's story. In Thinking Small, journalist and cultural historian Andrea Hiott retraces the improbable journey of this little car that changed the world.

Andrea Hiott's wide-ranging narrative stretches from the factory floors of Weimar Germany to the executive suites of today's automotive innovators, showing how a succession of artists and engineers shepherded the Beetle to market through periods of privation and war, reconstruction and recovery. Henry Ford's Model T may have revolutionized the American auto industry, but for years Europe remained a place where only the elite drove cars. That all changed with the advent of the Volkswagen, the product of a Nazi initiative to bring driving to the masses. But Hitler's concept of "the people's car" would soon take on new meaning. As Germany rebuilt from the rubble of World War II, a whole generation succumbed to the charms of the world's most huggable automobile.

Indeed, the story of the Volkswagen is a story about people, and Hiott introduces us to the men who believed in it, built it, and sold it: Ferdinand Porsche, the visionary Austrian automobile designer whose futuristic dream of an affordable family vehicle was fatally compromised by his patron Adolf Hitler's monomaniacal drive toward war; Heinrich Nordhoff, the forward-thinking German industrialist whose management innovations made mass production of the Beetle a reality; and Bill Bernbach, the Jewish American advertising executive whose team of Madison Avenue mavericks dreamed up the legendary ad campaign that transformed the quintessential German compact into an outsize worldwide phenomenon.

Thinking Small is the remarkable story of an automobile and an idea. Hatched in an age of darkness, the Beetle emerged into the light of a new era as a symbol of individuality and personal mobility-a triumph not of the will but of the imagination.
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Squadron/Signal Publications 6011: Aces of the Southwest Pacific

Gene B. Stafford, Don Greer – Aces of the Southwest Pacific
Squadron/Signal Publications | 1977 | ISBN: 089747063X | English | 66 pages | PDF | 31.52 MB
Squadron/Signal Publications 6011
August 1945 — Japan's dream of conquest and empire was ended. The vision of an Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere which had seemed so bright in early 1941 now lay buried beneath the twisted rubble of the cities on the Home Islands, it lay rusting on the bottom of the vast Pacific Ocean, and it lay rotting in the unchartered jungles of a hundred scattered islands or the rain forests on the continent of Asia. From the first day of the war, the fighter pilots of the Army Air Force met the enemy in the skies. This book is concerned with a relatively small number of these men, the ones who by downing at least five enemy planes in the air qualified for the title "ace". It is, however, a tribute to the thousands of other men who served with the Air Force in the Pacific.
The airwar against Japan was truely vast in terms of the area involved. In the 45 months between Pearl Harbor and the cessation of hostilities, the ebb and flow of battle touched some 30 million square miles. This is equivalent to roughly one sixth the total surface of the earth. By way of comparison, the war against Germany was al­most a local action.
The Eleventh Air Force carried on a short, cold and lonely war in the far north in response to the Japanese invastion of the Aleutians. Though actions were infrequent, a few of the pilots who served in this theater later went on to serve in other theaters. In the Far East, it was the American Volunteer Group and later the Tenth and Fourteenth Air Forces that carried the air war to the Japanese. The Tenth was based in India while the Fourteenth operated from China. The Central Pacific was the preserve of the Seventh and Twentieth Air Forces toward the end of the war as the noose drew tight around the Japanese Home Islands.

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