Tag Archives: spans

Organizational Realities: Studies of Strategizing and Organizing

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Organizational Realities: Studies of Strategizing and Organizing By William H. Starbuck
Publisher: O U P 2006 | 656 Pages | ISBN: 0199288518 | PDF | 3 MB

Organizational Realities: Studies of Strategizing and Organizing
William H. Starbuck, is one of the most creative, productive and wide-ranging writers in management and organization studies. His work spans three decades and encompasses a whole variety of issues, yet it has never been collected together in one place. This book does just that-bringing together his most seminal writing, prefaced by a personal reflection on some of the themes and conclusions of that emerge from this, and the context I which they were written.
What emerges from this is a picture of organizations and their strategies that emphasizes the characteristics of real-life human beings: their idiosyncratic preferences, their distrust for each other, their struggle for dominance, their personal interests which don't always coincide with the interests of the organization, and the internal politicking and contests between interests groups that take place in organizations. Some chapters review research literature, some report empirical findings, some propose conceptual reformulation, and some offer advice to managers.
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Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures

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Bridges: The science and art of the world's most inspiring structures by David Blockley
English | 2010 | ISBN: 0199543593 | 329 Pages | PDF | 2 MB
The Brooklyn Bridge, London's Tower Bridge, Sydney's Harbour Bridge, San Francisco's Golden Gate–bridges can be breathtakingly monumental structures, magnificent works of art, and vital arteries that make life vastly easier.

Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures
In Bridges , eminent structural engineer David Blockley takes readers on a fascinating guided tour of bridge construction, ranging from the primitive rope bridges (now mainly found in adventure movies), to Roman aqueducts and the timber trestle railway bridges of the American West, to today's modern marvels, such as the Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge, which has the largest span in the world. Blockley outlines the forces at work on a bridge–tension, compression, and shear–and the basic structural elements that combat these forces–beams, arches, trusses, and suspensions (or BATS). As he does so, he explores some of the great bridges around the world, including such lesser-known masterpieces as the Forth Railway Bridge (featured in Alfred Hitchcock's The Thirty-Nine Steps ), and describes some spectacular failures, such as the recent bridge collapse in Minnesota or the famous failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in 1940. For instance, Blockley discusses the London's Millennium Bridge–the blade of light across the Thames–which displayed an alarming wobble when opened. He explains that when people walk, they not only exert force directly forward, but also exert a lesser force to the side, and the Millennium Bridge engineers did not consider this tiny lateral movement in their otherwise meticulous design. Amazingly enough, this minor omission caused a wobble severe enough to close the bridge for two years. Bridge building is a magnificent example of the practical use of science. But as Blockley shows in this illuminating book, engineers must go beyond science, blending technical experience and creativity to build the spans that connect us all.
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Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures

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Bridges: The science and art of the world's most inspiring structures by David Blockley
English | 2010 | ISBN: 0199543593 | 329 Pages | PDF | 2 MB
The Brooklyn Bridge, London's Tower Bridge, Sydney's Harbour Bridge, San Francisco's Golden Gate–bridges can be breathtakingly monumental structures, magnificent works of art, and vital arteries that make life vastly easier.

Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures
In Bridges , eminent structural engineer David Blockley takes readers on a fascinating guided tour of bridge construction, ranging from the primitive rope bridges (now mainly found in adventure movies), to Roman aqueducts and the timber trestle railway bridges of the American West, to today's modern marvels, such as the Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge, which has the largest span in the world. Blockley outlines the forces at work on a bridge–tension, compression, and shear–and the basic structural elements that combat these forces–beams, arches, trusses, and suspensions (or BATS). As he does so, he explores some of the great bridges around the world, including such lesser-known masterpieces as the Forth Railway Bridge (featured in Alfred Hitchcock's The Thirty-Nine Steps ), and describes some spectacular failures, such as the recent bridge collapse in Minnesota or the famous failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in 1940. For instance, Blockley discusses the London's Millennium Bridge–the blade of light across the Thames–which displayed an alarming wobble when opened. He explains that when people walk, they not only exert force directly forward, but also exert a lesser force to the side, and the Millennium Bridge engineers did not consider this tiny lateral movement in their otherwise meticulous design. Amazingly enough, this minor omission caused a wobble severe enough to close the bridge for two years. Bridge building is a magnificent example of the practical use of science. But as Blockley shows in this illuminating book, engineers must go beyond science, blending technical experience and creativity to build the spans that connect us all.
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Gun Control in the Third Reich: Disarming the Jews and “Enemies of the State”

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Gun Control in the Third Reich: Disarming the Jews and "Enemies of the State" by Stephen P. Halbrook
English | 2014 | ISBN: 1598131621, 1598131613 | 364 pages | EPUB | 4 MB

Gun Control in the Third Reich: Disarming the Jews and “Enemies of the State”
Based on newly-discovered, secret documents from German archives, diaries and newspapers of the time, Gun Control in the Third Reich presents the definitive, yet hidden history of how the Nazi regime made use of gun control to disarm and repress its enemies and consolidate power. The countless books on the Third Reich and the Holocaust fail even to mention the laws restricting firearms ownership, which rendered political opponents and Jews defenseless. A skeptic could surmise that a better-armed populace might have made no difference, but the National Socialist regime certainly did not think so-it ruthlessly suppressed firearm ownership by disfavored groups.

Gun Control in the Third Reich spans the two decades from the birth of the Weimar Republic in 1918 through Kristallnacht in 1938. The book then presents a panorama of pertinent events during World War II regarding the effects of the disarming policies. And even though in the occupied countries the Nazis decreed the death penalty for possession of a firearm, there developed instances of heroic armed resistance by Jews, particularly the Warsaw ghetto uprising.
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Sound and Safe: A History of Listening Behind the Wheel

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Sound and Safe: A History of Listening Behind the Wheel by Karin Bijsterveld, Eefje Cleophas, Stefan Krebs, Gijs Mom
2013 | ISBN: 0199925690 | English | 248 pages | PDF | 4 MB

Sound and Safe: A History of Listening Behind the Wheel
Do you enjoy listening to music while driving? Do you find radio traffic information indispensable? Do you like to sing along with whatever you like as you drive?

This book tells the fascinating story of how, over the course of the twentieth century, we turned automobiles from intentionally noisy contraptions into spheres of auditory privacy that make us feel sound and safe. It explains how engineers in the automotive industry found pride in making car engines quieter once they realized that noise stood for inefficiency. And, after the automobile had become a closed vehicle, it follows them as they struggled against sounds audible within the car. The book also traces how noise is linked both to fears – fears of noise-induced fatigue, fears about the danger of the car radio and drivers' attention spans – and to wants, exploring how drivers at one point actually desired to listen to their cars' engines in order to diagnose mechanical problems and how they now appreciate radio traffic information. And it suggests that their disdain for the ever-expanding number of roadside noise barriers made them long for new forms of in-car audio entertainment.

This book also allows you to peep behind the scenes of international standardization committees and automotive test benches. What did and does the automotive industry do to secure the sounds characteristic for their brands? Drawing on archives, interviews, beautiful historical automotive ads, and writing from cultural history, science and technology studies, sound and sensory studies, this book unveils the hidden history of an everyday phenomenon. It is about the sounds of car engines, tires, wipers, blinkers, warning signals, in-car audio systems and, ultimately, about how we became used to listening while driving.
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The Ukulele: A History

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The Ukulele: A History by Jim Tranquada and John King
English | 2012 | ISBN: 0824836340, 0824835441 | 296 pages | PDF | 17,6 MB

The Ukulele: A History
Winner of the 2013 Ka Palapala Po'okela Award for Excellence in Special-Interest Books

Early praise: 'Here, at last, is the complete story of the 'ukulele. Thanks to the authors' years of tireless research, the instrument's incredible journey is brought vividly to life. This book is a labor of love and a gift of enduring scholarship.' –Jim Beloff, author of The Ukulele: A Visual History

Since its introduction to Hawaii in 1879, the 'ukulele has been many things: a symbol of an island paradise; a tool of political protest; an instrument central to a rich musical culture; a musical joke; a highly sought-after collectible; a cheap airport souvenir; a lucrative industry; and the product of a remarkable synthesis of western and Pacific cultures. The 'Ukulele: A History explores all of these facets, placing the instrument for the first time in a broad historical, cultural, and musical context.

Drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, Jim Tranquada and John King tell the surprising story of how an obscure four-string folk guitar from Portugal became the national instrument of Hawaii, of its subsequent rise and fall from international cultural phenomenon to 'the Dangerfield of instruments,'; and of the resurgence in popularity (and respect) it is currently enjoying among musicians from Thailand to Finland. The book shows how the technologies of successive generations (recorded music, radio, television, the Internet) have played critical roles in popularizing the 'ukulele. Famous composers and entertainers (Queen Liliuokalani, Irving Berlin, Arthur Godfrey, Paul McCartney, Jake Shimabukuro) and writers (Rudyard Kipling, Jack London, P. G. Wodehouse, Agatha Christie) wind their way through its history along with a host of outstanding Hawaiian musicians (Ernest Kaai, George Kia Nahaolelua, Samuel K. Kamakaia, Henry A. Peelua Bishaw). In telling the story of the 'ukulele, Tranquada and King also present a sweeping history of modern Hawaiian music that spans more than two centuries, beginning with the introduction of western melody and harmony by missionaries through the Hawaiian music renaissance of the 1970s and 1980s, to the contemporary stylings of today.
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The 47 Best Chocolate Chip Cookies in the World

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The 47 Best Chocolate Chip Cookies in the World: The Recipes That Won the National Chocolate Chip Cookie Contest by Honey Zisman
English | Oct 15, 1983 | ISBN: 0312299834 | 86 Pages | PDF | 13 MB
Chocolate chip cookies are a true American delicacy: at the Toll House restaurant near Boston, Ruth Wakefield invented the very first "toll house" cookies with chopped-up bits of a Nestle's chocolate bar.

The 47 Best Chocolate Chip Cookies in the World
Originally inspired by a contest to find the best cookies in the nation, The 47 Best Chocolate Chip Cookies in the World spans the kitchens of America from Muskegon, Michigan, to Costa Mesa, California–and includes delectable tidbits of cookie lore (did you know that Napoleon always carried chocolate into battle with him for quick energy?) The only thing better than this book is a box of chocolate chip cookies!

Chocolate Chip and Macadamia Nuts
Bavarian Mint Chippers
Almond Chip Drops
Italian Chocolate Chip Cookies
Chocolate Chip Pizza
Sweet and Wholewheat Cookies
And More!
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The 47 Best Chocolate Chip Cookies in the World

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The 47 Best Chocolate Chip Cookies in the World: The Recipes That Won the National Chocolate Chip Cookie Contest by Honey Zisman
English | Oct 15, 1983 | ISBN: 0312299834 | 86 Pages | PDF | 13 MB
Chocolate chip cookies are a true American delicacy: at the Toll House restaurant near Boston, Ruth Wakefield invented the very first "toll house" cookies with chopped-up bits of a Nestle's chocolate bar.

The 47 Best Chocolate Chip Cookies in the World
Originally inspired by a contest to find the best cookies in the nation, The 47 Best Chocolate Chip Cookies in the World spans the kitchens of America from Muskegon, Michigan, to Costa Mesa, California–and includes delectable tidbits of cookie lore (did you know that Napoleon always carried chocolate into battle with him for quick energy?) The only thing better than this book is a box of chocolate chip cookies!

Chocolate Chip and Macadamia Nuts
Bavarian Mint Chippers
Almond Chip Drops
Italian Chocolate Chip Cookies
Chocolate Chip Pizza
Sweet and Wholewheat Cookies
And More!
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