Tag Archives: Triumph

Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle

FREEDownload : Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle

Andrea Hiott, "Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle"
English | ISBN: 0345521420 | 2012 | EPUB | 512 pages | 7 MB

Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle
Sometimes achieving big things requires the ability to think small. This simple concept was the driving force that propelled the Volkswagen Beetle to become an avatar of American-style freedom, a household brand, and a global icon. The VW Bug inspired the ad men of Madison Avenue, beguiled Woodstock Nation, and has recently been re-imagined for the hipster generation. And while today it is surely one of the most recognizable cars in the world, few of us know the compelling details of this car's story. In Thinking Small, journalist and cultural historian Andrea Hiott retraces the improbable journey of this little car that changed the world.

Andrea Hiott's wide-ranging narrative stretches from the factory floors of Weimar Germany to the executive suites of today's automotive innovators, showing how a succession of artists and engineers shepherded the Beetle to market through periods of privation and war, reconstruction and recovery. Henry Ford's Model T may have revolutionized the American auto industry, but for years Europe remained a place where only the elite drove cars. That all changed with the advent of the Volkswagen, the product of a Nazi initiative to bring driving to the masses. But Hitler's concept of "the people's car" would soon take on new meaning. As Germany rebuilt from the rubble of World War II, a whole generation succumbed to the charms of the world's most huggable automobile.

Indeed, the story of the Volkswagen is a story about people, and Hiott introduces us to the men who believed in it, built it, and sold it: Ferdinand Porsche, the visionary Austrian automobile designer whose futuristic dream of an affordable family vehicle was fatally compromised by his patron Adolf Hitler's monomaniacal drive toward war; Heinrich Nordhoff, the forward-thinking German industrialist whose management innovations made mass production of the Beetle a reality; and Bill Bernbach, the Jewish American advertising executive whose team of Madison Avenue mavericks dreamed up the legendary ad campaign that transformed the quintessential German compact into an outsize worldwide phenomenon.

Thinking Small is the remarkable story of an automobile and an idea. Hatched in an age of darkness, the Beetle emerged into the light of a new era as a symbol of individuality and personal mobility-a triumph not of the will but of the imagination.
Download:
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Max Speed
Uploaded.net:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle

FREEDownload : Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle

Andrea Hiott, "Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle"
English | ISBN: 0345521420 | 2012 | EPUB | 512 pages | 7 MB

Thinking Small: The Long, Strange Trip of the Volkswagen Beetle
Sometimes achieving big things requires the ability to think small. This simple concept was the driving force that propelled the Volkswagen Beetle to become an avatar of American-style freedom, a household brand, and a global icon. The VW Bug inspired the ad men of Madison Avenue, beguiled Woodstock Nation, and has recently been re-imagined for the hipster generation. And while today it is surely one of the most recognizable cars in the world, few of us know the compelling details of this car's story. In Thinking Small, journalist and cultural historian Andrea Hiott retraces the improbable journey of this little car that changed the world.

Andrea Hiott's wide-ranging narrative stretches from the factory floors of Weimar Germany to the executive suites of today's automotive innovators, showing how a succession of artists and engineers shepherded the Beetle to market through periods of privation and war, reconstruction and recovery. Henry Ford's Model T may have revolutionized the American auto industry, but for years Europe remained a place where only the elite drove cars. That all changed with the advent of the Volkswagen, the product of a Nazi initiative to bring driving to the masses. But Hitler's concept of "the people's car" would soon take on new meaning. As Germany rebuilt from the rubble of World War II, a whole generation succumbed to the charms of the world's most huggable automobile.

Indeed, the story of the Volkswagen is a story about people, and Hiott introduces us to the men who believed in it, built it, and sold it: Ferdinand Porsche, the visionary Austrian automobile designer whose futuristic dream of an affordable family vehicle was fatally compromised by his patron Adolf Hitler's monomaniacal drive toward war; Heinrich Nordhoff, the forward-thinking German industrialist whose management innovations made mass production of the Beetle a reality; and Bill Bernbach, the Jewish American advertising executive whose team of Madison Avenue mavericks dreamed up the legendary ad campaign that transformed the quintessential German compact into an outsize worldwide phenomenon.

Thinking Small is the remarkable story of an automobile and an idea. Hatched in an age of darkness, the Beetle emerged into the light of a new era as a symbol of individuality and personal mobility-a triumph not of the will but of the imagination.
Download:
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Max Speed
Uploaded.net:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




The Dark Side of Modernity

FREEDownload : The Dark Side of Modernity

The Dark Side of Modernity by Jeffrey C. Alexander
English | 2013 | ISBN: 0745648215 , 0745648223 | 200 pages | PDF | 0,7 MB
In this book, one of the world's leading social theorists presents a critical, alarmed, but also nuanced understanding of the post-traditional world we inhabit today. Jeffrey Alexander writes about modernity as historical time and social condition, but also as ideology and utopia.

The Dark Side of Modernity
The idea of modernity embodies the Enlightenment's noble hopes for progress and rationality, but its reality brings great suffering and exposes the destructive impulses that continue to motivate humankind.

Alexander examines how twentieth-century theorists struggled to comprehend the Janus-faced character of modernity, which looks backward and forward at the same time. Weber linked the triumph of worldly asceticism to liberating autonomy but also ruthless domination, describing flights from rationalization as systemic and dangerous. Simmel pointed to the otherness haunting modernity, even as he normalized the stranger. Eisenstadt celebrated Axial Age transcendence, but acknowledged its increasing capacity for barbarity. Parsons heralded American community, but ignored modernity's fragmentations.

Rather than seeking to resolve modernity's contradictions, Alexander argues that social theory should accept its Janus-faced character. It is a dangerous delusion to think that modernity can eliminate evil. Civil inclusion and anti-civil exclusion are intertwined. Alexander enumerates dangerous frictions endemic to modernity, but he also suggests new lines of social amelioration and emotional repair.
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Max Speed

rapidgator_net:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




Joan Mitchell: Lady Painter

FREEDownload : Joan Mitchell: Lady Painter

Joan Mitchell: Lady Painter by Patricia Albers
English | 2011 | ISBN: 0375414371 | 544 pages | EPUB | 14 MB

Joan Mitchell: Lady Painter
"Gee, Joan, if only you were French and male and dead." -New York art dealer to Joan Mitchell, the 1950s

She was a steel heiress from the Midwest-Chicago and Lake Forest (her grandfather built Chicago's bridges and worked for Andrew Carnegie). She was a daughter of the American Revolution-Anglo-Saxon, Republican, Episcopalian.

She was tough, disciplined, courageous, dazzling, and went up against the masculine art world at its most entrenched, made her way in it, and disproved their notion that women couldn't paint.

Joan Mitchell is the first full-scale biography of the abstract expressionist painter who came of age in the 1950s, '60s, and '70s; a portrait of an outrageous artist and her struggling artist world, painters making their way in the second part of America's twentieth century.

As a young girl she was a champion figure skater, and though she lacked balance and coordination, accomplished one athletic triumph after another, until giving up competitive skating to become a painter.

Mitchell saw people and things in color; color and emotion were the same to her. She said, "I use the past to make my pic[tures] and I want all of it and even you and me in candlelight on the train and every lover' I've ever had-every friend-nothing closed out. It's all part of me and I want to confront it and sleep with it-the dreams-and paint it."

Her work had an unerring sense of formal rectitude, daring, and discipline, as well as delicacy, grace, and awkwardness.

Mitchell exuded a young, smoky, tough glamour and was thought of as "sexy as hell."

Albers writes about how Mitchell married her girlhood pal, Barnet Rosset, Jr.-scion of a financier who was head of Chicago's Metropolitan Trust and partner of Jimmy Roosevelt. Rosset went on to buy Grove Press in 1951, at Mitchell's urging, and to publish Henry Miller, Samuel Beckett, Jean Genet, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, et al., making Grove into the great avant-garde publishing house of its time.

Mitchell's life was messy and reckless: in New York and East Hampton carousing with de Kooning, Frank O'Hara, James Schuyler, Jane Freilicher, Franz Kline, Helen Frankenthaler, and others; going to clambakes, cocktail parties, softball games-and living an entirely different existence in Paris and Vétheuil.

Mitchell's inner life embraced a world beyond her own craft, especially literature . . . her compositions were informed by imagined landscapes or feelings about places.

In Joan Mitchell, Patricia Albers brilliantly reconstructs the painter's large and impassioned life: her growing prominence as an artist; her marriage and affairs; her friendships with poets and painters; her extraordinary work.

Joan Mitchell re-creates the times, the people, and her worlds from the 1920s through the 1990s and brings it all spectacularly to life.
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Max Speed

rapidgator_net:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




The Bates Method for Better Eyesight Without Glasses – by W. H. Bates

FREEDownload : The Bates Method for Better Eyesight Without Glasses – by W. H. Bates

The Bates Method for Better Eyesight Without Glasses – by W. H. Bates
Language: English
Publisher: Holt Paperbacks
ISBN-10: 0805002413 | ISBN-13: 978-0805002416 | 208 Pages | PDF | 2.19 MB
This book provides Dr. Bates's time-honored program, which has helped hundreds of thousands of people triumph over normal defects of vision without the aid of eyeglasses.

The Bates Method for Better Eyesight Without Glasses – by W. H. Bates

Download Links:
rapidgator_net:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




Caesar’s Gallic Triumph: The Battle of Alesia 52BC (Campaign Chronicles)

FREEDownload : Caesar’s Gallic Triumph: The Battle of Alesia 52BC (Campaign Chronicles)

Caesar's Gallic Triumph: The Battle of Alesia 52BC (Campaign Chronicles)
Pen and Sword Military | 2008 | ISBN: 1844156753 | English | 192 Pages | EPUB | 4 MB

Caesar’s Gallic Triumph: The Battle of Alesia 52BC (Campaign Chronicles)
In 52 B.C. at Alesia in what is now Burgundy in France Julius Caesar pulled off one of the great feats of Roman arms. His heavily outnumbered army utterly defeated the combined forces of the Gallic tribes led by Vercingetorix and completed the Roman conquest of Gaul. The Alesia campaign, and the epic siege in which it culminated, was one of Caesar 's finest military achievements, and it has fascinated historians ever since.
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Max Speed

rapidgator_net:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed




Caesar’s Gallic Triumph: The Battle of Alesia 52BC (Campaign Chronicles)

FREEDownload : Caesar’s Gallic Triumph: The Battle of Alesia 52BC (Campaign Chronicles)

Caesar's Gallic Triumph: The Battle of Alesia 52BC (Campaign Chronicles)
Pen and Sword Military | 2008 | ISBN: 1844156753 | English | 192 Pages | EPUB | 4 MB

Caesar’s Gallic Triumph: The Battle of Alesia 52BC (Campaign Chronicles)
In 52 B.C. at Alesia in what is now Burgundy in France Julius Caesar pulled off one of the great feats of Roman arms. His heavily outnumbered army utterly defeated the combined forces of the Gallic tribes led by Vercingetorix and completed the Roman conquest of Gaul. The Alesia campaign, and the epic siege in which it culminated, was one of Caesar 's finest military achievements, and it has fascinated historians ever since.
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Max Speed

rapidgator_net:

Continue reading


14 Days Free Access to USENET
Free 300 GB with 10 GB High-Speed