Tag Archives: World’s

Tasting Whiskey: An Insider’s Guide to the Unique Pleasures of the World’s Finest Spirits

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Lew Bryson, "Tasting Whiskey: An Insider's Guide to the Unique Pleasures of the World's Finest Spirits"
English | ISBN: 1612123015 | 2014 | PDF | 256 pages | 148 MB

Tasting Whiskey: An Insider’s Guide to the Unique Pleasures of the World’s Finest Spirits
Whiskey lovers will devour this fresh and comprehensive guide to everything there is to know about the world's whiskeys, including Scotch and bourbon as well as Tennessee, Irish, Japanese, and Canadian whiskeys. You'll learn about the types of whiskey and the distilling traditions of the regions where they are made, how to serve and taste whiskeys to best appreciate and savor them, how to collect and age whiskey for great results, and much more. There are even recipes for cocktails and suggestions for food pairings. This is the guide no whiskey drinker will want to be without!
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Tasting Whiskey: An Insider’s Guide to the Unique Pleasures of the World’s Finest Spirits

FREEDownload : Tasting Whiskey: An Insider’s Guide to the Unique Pleasures of the World’s Finest Spirits

Lew Bryson, "Tasting Whiskey: An Insider's Guide to the Unique Pleasures of the World's Finest Spirits"
English | ISBN: 1612123015 | 2014 | PDF | 256 pages | 148 MB

Tasting Whiskey: An Insider’s Guide to the Unique Pleasures of the World’s Finest Spirits
Whiskey lovers will devour this fresh and comprehensive guide to everything there is to know about the world's whiskeys, including Scotch and bourbon as well as Tennessee, Irish, Japanese, and Canadian whiskeys. You'll learn about the types of whiskey and the distilling traditions of the regions where they are made, how to serve and taste whiskeys to best appreciate and savor them, how to collect and age whiskey for great results, and much more. There are even recipes for cocktails and suggestions for food pairings. This is the guide no whiskey drinker will want to be without!
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TTC How We Learn (Audiobook)

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TTC How We Learn (Audiobook)
English | MP3 128 kbps | 24 Lectures | 361 MB
Learning is a lifelong adventure. It starts in your mother's womb, accelerates to high speed in infancy and childhood, and continues through every age, whether you're actively engaged in mastering a new skill, intuitively discovering an unfamiliar place, or just sleeping, which is fundamental to helping you consolidate and hold on to what you've learned. You are truly born to learn around the clock.

TTC How We Learn (Audiobook)
But few of us know how we learn, which is the key to learning and studying more effectively. For example, you may be surprised by the following:

People tend to misjudge what they have learned well, what they don't yet know, and what they do and do not need to practice.
Moments of confusion, frustration, uncertainty, and lack of confidence are part of the process of acquiring new skills and new knowledge.
Humans and animals explore their worlds for the sake of learning, regardless of rewards and punishment connected with success.
You can teach an old dog new tricks. In fact, older learners have the benefit of prior knowledge and critical skills—two advantages in learning.
Shedding light on what's going on when we learn and dispelling common myths about the subject, How We Learn introduces you to this practical and accessible science in 24 half-hour lectures presented by Professor Monisha Pasupathi of the University of Utah, an award-winning psychology teacher and expert on how people of all ages learn.

A Course about You

Customers of The Great Courses are already devoted to lifelong learning and may be surprised at how complicated the process of learning is. We have a single word for it—learn—but it occurs in a fascinating variety of ways, which Professor Pasupathi recounts in detail. She describes a wide range of experiments that may strike a familiar chord as you recognize something about yourself or others:

scripts: We have trouble recalling specific events until we have first learned scripts for those events. Young children are prodigious learners of scripts, but so are first-time parents, college freshmen, foreign travelers, and new employees.
Variable ratio reinforcement: Children whining for candy are usually refused, but the few occasions when parents give in encourage maximal display of the behavior. The same principle is behind the success of slot machines and other unpredictable rewards.
Storytelling: Telling stories is fundamentally an act of learning about ourselves. The way we recount experiences, usually shortly after the event, has lasting effects on the way we remember those experiences and what we learn from them.
Sleeper effect: Have you ever heard something from an unreliable source and later found yourself believing it? Over time, we tend to remember information but forget the source. Paradoxically, this effect is stronger when the source is less credible.
Dr. Pasupathi's many examples cover the modern history of research on learning—from behaviorist theory in the early 20th century to the most recent debates about whether IQ can be separated from achievement, or whether a spectrum of different learning styles and multiple intelligences really exist.

What You Will Learn

You start by examining 10 myths about learning. These can get in the way of making the fullest use of the extraordinary capacity for learning and include widespread beliefs, such as that college-educated people already know how to maximize learning or that a person must be interested in a subject in order to learn it.

Professor Pasupathi then covers mistaken theories of learning, such as that lab animals and humans learn in the same way or that the brain is a tabula rasa, a blank slate that can absorb information without preparation. Babies might seem to be a counterexample, showing that you can learn from scratch. However, you examine what newborns must know at birth in order for them to learn so much, so quickly.

Next you explore in depth how humans master different tasks, from learning a native language or a second language, to becoming adept at a sport or a musical instrument, to learning a new city or a problem-solving strategy, to grasping the distinctive style of thinking required in mathematics and science. Then you look inside the learning process itself, where many factors come into play, including what is being learned and the context, along with the emotions, motivations, and goals of the learner. You close by considering individual differences. Some people seem to learn without effort. How do they do it?

Tips on Learning

Along the way, Professor Pasupathi offers frequent advice on how to excel in many different learning situations:

Mastering material: Testing yourself is a very effective strategy for mastering difficult material. Try taking a blank sheet of paper and writing down everything you can recall about the subject. Then go back and review the material. Next, try another blank sheet of paper.
Second-language learning: Becoming fluent in a second language in adulthood is difficult because your brain is tuned to your native language and misses important clues in the new language. To overcome this obstacle, immerse yourself among native speakers of the new language.
Motivating a child: When trying to motivate a schoolchild to learn, avoid controlling language, create opportunities to give the child a sense of choice, and be careful about excessive praise and other forms of rewards, which can actually undermine learning.
Maintaining a learning edge: Middle-aged and older adults can preserve their learning aptitude by exercising to maintain cardiovascular health, staying mentally active, and periodically trying a new challenge, such as learning to draw or studying new dance steps.
Adventures in Learning

Winner of prestigious teaching awards from her university's chapter of Psi Chi, the National Honor Society in Psychology, Dr. Pasupathi brings today's exciting field of learning research alive. Her descriptions of ongoing work in her field, in which she is a prominent participant, are vivid and insightful, allowing you to put yourself into a given experiment and ask, "How would I react under these circumstances? What does this tell me about my own approach to learning?"

By the time How We Learn ends, you will appreciate the incredible breadth of what we learn in our lifetimes, understand the commonality and diversity of human learning experiences, and come away with strategies for enhancing your own adventures in learning.

"Learning is a human birthright," says Professor Pasupathi. "Everything about us is built for lifelong learning—from our unusually long childhood and our large prefrontal cortex to our interest in novelty and challenge." And she finds reason for optimism about the future of humanity due to our almost miraculous capacity to learn.

About Your Professor

Dr. Monisha Pasupathi is Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Utah. She holds a Ph.D. in Psychology from Stanford University. She joined the faculty at Utah in 1999 after completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Germany.

Professor Pasupathi has been honored multiple times for her teaching. She was named Best Psychology Professor by her university's chapter of Psi Chi, the National Honor Society in Psychology. Psi Chi also awarded her the Outstanding Educator Award and Favorite Professor Award.

Professor Pasupathi's research focuses on how people of all ages learn from their experiences, particularly through storytelling. She is coeditor of Narrative Development in Adolescence: Creating the Storied Self, and her work has been published widely in scholarly journals.

Directory of TTC Teaching Company – How We Learn 2012

01 Myths about Learning.mp3
02 Why No Single Learning Theory Works.mp3
03 Learning as Information Processing.mp3
04 Creating Representations.mp3
05 Categories, Rules, and scripts.mp3
06 What Babies Know.mp3
07 Learning Your Native Tongue.mp3
08 Learning a Second Language.mp3
09 Learning How to Move.mp3
10 Learning Our Way Around.mp3
11 Learning to Tell Stories.mp3
12 Learning Approaches in Math and Science.mp3
13 Learning as Theory Testing.mp3
14 Integrating Different Domains of Learning.mp3
15 Cognitive Constraints on Learning.mp3
16 Choosing Learning Strategies.mp3
17 Source Knowledge and Learning.mp3
18 The Role of Emotion in Learning.mp3
19 Cultivating a Desire to Learn.mp3
20 Intelligence and Learning.mp3
21 Are Learning Styles Real.mp3
22 Different People, Different Interests.mp3
23 Learning across the Lifespan.mp3
24 Making the Most of How We Learn.mp3
How We Learn.txt

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Inteliquest World’s 100 Greatest People

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Inteliquest World's 100 Greatest People
English | MP3 | Audiobook Collection | All in One | 2.82 GB

Inteliquest World’s 100 Greatest People
List

WGP 001 Socrates.mp3
WGP 002 Plato.mp3
WGP 003 Aristotle.mp3
WGP 004 Francis Bacon.mp3
WGP 005 Rene Descartes.mp3
WGP 006 John Locke.mp3
WGP 007 Voltaire.mp3
WGP 008 Jean Jacques Rousseau.mp3
WGP 009 Adam Smith.mp3
WGP 010 Immanuel Kant.mp3
WGP 011 Karl Marx.mp3
WGP 012 Friedrich Nietzsche.mp3
WGP 013 Marco Polo.mp3
WGP 014 Christopher Columbus.mp3
WGP 015 Vasco Da Gama.mp3
WGP 016 Ferdninand Magellan.mp3
WGP 017 James Cook.mp3
WGP 018 Roald Amundsen.mp3
WGP 019 Archimedes.mp3
WGP 020 Johann Gutenberg.mp3
WGP 021 Eli Whitney.mp3
WGP 022 Thomas Edison.mp3
WGP 023 Alexander Graham Bell.mp3
WGP 024 Henry Ford.mp3
WGP 025 Orville and Wilbur Wright.mp3
WGP 026 Guglielmo Marconi.mp3
WGP 027 Galen.mp3
WGP 028 Nicolaus Copernicus.mp3
WGP 029 Galileo.mp3
WGP 030 Isaac Newton.mp3
WGP 031Charles Darwin.mp3
WGP 032 Louis Pasteur.mp3
WGP 033 Gregor Mendel.mp3
WGP 034 Joseph Lister.mp3
WGP 035 Sigmund Freud.mp3
WGP 036 Marie Curie.mp3
WGP 037 Albert Einstein.mp3
WGP 038 Alexander Fleming.mp3
WGP 039 Jonas Salk.mp3
WGP 040 Sophocles.mp3
WGP 041 Virgil.mp3
WGP 042 Dante Alighieri.mp3
WGP 043 Geoffrey Chaucer.mp3
WGP 044 William Shakespeare.mp3
WGP 045 John Milton.mp3
WGP 046 Charles Dickens.mp3
WGP 047 George Eliot.mp3
WGP 048 Leo Tolstoy.mp3
WGP 049 Emily Dickinson.mp3
WGP 050 Mark Twain.mp3
WGP 051 Leonardo Da Vinci.mp3
WGP 052 Raphael.mp3
WGP 053 Michelangelo.mp3
WGP 054 Rembrandt.mp3
WGP 055 Claude Monet.mp3
WGP 056 Vincent Van Gogh.mp3
WGP 057 Pablo Picasso.mp3
WGP 058 Johann Sebastian Bach.mp3
WGP 059 George Frideric Handel.mp3
WGP 060 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.mp3
WGP 061 Ludwig Van Beethoven.mp3
WGP 062 Frederic Chopin.mp3
WGP 063 Richard Wagner.mp3
WGP 064 Johannes Brahms.mp3
WGP 065 Peter Tchaikovsky.mp3
WGP 066 Claude Debussy.mp3
WGP 067 Abraham.mp3
WGP 068 Moses.mp3
WGP 069 Lao-Tzu.mp3
WGP 070 Buddah.mp3
WGP 071 Confucius.mp3
WGP 072 Jesus Christ.mp3
WGP 073 The Apostle Paul.mp3
WGP 074 Saint Augustine.mp3
WGP 075 Muhammad.mp3
WGP 076 Thomas Aquinas.mp3
WGP 077 Martin Luther.mp3
WGP 078 John Calvin.mp3
WGP 079 Joseph Smith.mp3
WGP 080 Constantine the Great.mp3
WGP 081 Charlemagne.mp3
WGP 082 Queen Elizabeth I.mp3
WGP 083 Oliver Cromwell.mp3
WGP 084 Benjamin Franklin.mp3
WGP 085 Catherine the Great.mp3
WGP 086 George Washington.mp3
WGP 087 Thomas Jefferson.mp3
WGP 088 Abraham Lincoln.mp3
WGP 089 Susan B Anthony.mp3
WGP 090 Mahatma Ghandi.mp3
WGP 091 Winston Churchill.mp3
WGP 092 Franklin D Roosevelt.mp3
WGP 093 Martin Luther King.mp3
WGP 094 Alexander the Great.mp3
WGP 095 Julius Ceasar.mp3
WGP 096 William the Conquerer.mp3
WGP 097 Genghis Khan.mp3
WGP 098 Napolean Bonapart.mp3
WGP 099 Robert E Lee.mp3
WGP 100 Dwight D Eisenhower.mp3

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The Future of the Brain: Essays by the World’s Leading Neuroscientists

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Gary Marcus and Jeremy Freeman, "The Future of the Brain: Essays by the World's Leading Neuroscientists"
English | ISBN: 069116276X | 2014 | 304 pages | EPUB | 3 MB

The Future of the Brain: Essays by the World’s Leading Neuroscientists
An unprecedented look at the quest to unravel the mysteries of the human brain, The Future of the Brain takes readers to the absolute frontiers of science. Original essays by leading researchers such as Christof Koch, George Church, Olaf Sporns, and May-Britt and Edvard Moser describe the spectacular technological advances that will enable us to map the more than eighty-five billion neurons in the brain, as well as the challenges that lie ahead in understanding the anticipated deluge of data and the prospects for building working simulations of the human brain. A must-read for anyone trying to understand ambitious new research programs such as the Obama administration's BRAIN Initiative and the European Union's Human Brain Project, The Future of the Brain sheds light on the breathtaking implications of brain science for medicine, psychiatry, and even human consciousness itself.

Contributors include: Misha Ahrens, Ned Block, Matteo Carandini, George Church, John Donoghue, Chris Eliasmith, Simon Fisher, Mike Hawrylycz, Sean Hill, Christof Koch, Leah Krubitzer, Michel Maharbiz, Kevin Mitchell, Edvard Moser, May-Britt Moser, David Poeppel, Krishna Shenoy, Olaf Sporns, Anthony Zador.
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Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures

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Bridges: The science and art of the world's most inspiring structures by David Blockley
English | 2010 | ISBN: 0199543593 | 329 Pages | PDF | 2 MB
The Brooklyn Bridge, London's Tower Bridge, Sydney's Harbour Bridge, San Francisco's Golden Gate–bridges can be breathtakingly monumental structures, magnificent works of art, and vital arteries that make life vastly easier.

Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures
In Bridges , eminent structural engineer David Blockley takes readers on a fascinating guided tour of bridge construction, ranging from the primitive rope bridges (now mainly found in adventure movies), to Roman aqueducts and the timber trestle railway bridges of the American West, to today's modern marvels, such as the Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge, which has the largest span in the world. Blockley outlines the forces at work on a bridge–tension, compression, and shear–and the basic structural elements that combat these forces–beams, arches, trusses, and suspensions (or BATS). As he does so, he explores some of the great bridges around the world, including such lesser-known masterpieces as the Forth Railway Bridge (featured in Alfred Hitchcock's The Thirty-Nine Steps ), and describes some spectacular failures, such as the recent bridge collapse in Minnesota or the famous failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in 1940. For instance, Blockley discusses the London's Millennium Bridge–the blade of light across the Thames–which displayed an alarming wobble when opened. He explains that when people walk, they not only exert force directly forward, but also exert a lesser force to the side, and the Millennium Bridge engineers did not consider this tiny lateral movement in their otherwise meticulous design. Amazingly enough, this minor omission caused a wobble severe enough to close the bridge for two years. Bridge building is a magnificent example of the practical use of science. But as Blockley shows in this illuminating book, engineers must go beyond science, blending technical experience and creativity to build the spans that connect us all.
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Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures

FREEDownload : Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures

Bridges: The science and art of the world's most inspiring structures by David Blockley
English | 2010 | ISBN: 0199543593 | 329 Pages | PDF | 2 MB
The Brooklyn Bridge, London's Tower Bridge, Sydney's Harbour Bridge, San Francisco's Golden Gate–bridges can be breathtakingly monumental structures, magnificent works of art, and vital arteries that make life vastly easier.

Bridges: The science and art of the world’s most inspiring structures
In Bridges , eminent structural engineer David Blockley takes readers on a fascinating guided tour of bridge construction, ranging from the primitive rope bridges (now mainly found in adventure movies), to Roman aqueducts and the timber trestle railway bridges of the American West, to today's modern marvels, such as the Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge, which has the largest span in the world. Blockley outlines the forces at work on a bridge–tension, compression, and shear–and the basic structural elements that combat these forces–beams, arches, trusses, and suspensions (or BATS). As he does so, he explores some of the great bridges around the world, including such lesser-known masterpieces as the Forth Railway Bridge (featured in Alfred Hitchcock's The Thirty-Nine Steps ), and describes some spectacular failures, such as the recent bridge collapse in Minnesota or the famous failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in 1940. For instance, Blockley discusses the London's Millennium Bridge–the blade of light across the Thames–which displayed an alarming wobble when opened. He explains that when people walk, they not only exert force directly forward, but also exert a lesser force to the side, and the Millennium Bridge engineers did not consider this tiny lateral movement in their otherwise meticulous design. Amazingly enough, this minor omission caused a wobble severe enough to close the bridge for two years. Bridge building is a magnificent example of the practical use of science. But as Blockley shows in this illuminating book, engineers must go beyond science, blending technical experience and creativity to build the spans that connect us all.
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The Visual Miscellaneum: A Colorful Guide to the World’s Most Consequential Trivia

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The Visual Miscellaneum: A Colorful Guide to the World's Most Consequential Trivia by David McCandless
English | 2009 | ISBN: 0061748366 | 256 pages | EPUB | 23 MB

The Visual Miscellaneum: A Colorful Guide to the World’s Most Consequential Trivia
The Visual Miscellaneum is a unique, groundbreaking look at the modern information age, helping readers make sense of the countless statistics and random facts that constantly bombard us.

Using cutting edge graphs, charts, and illustrations, David McCandless creatively visualizes the world's surprising relationships and compelling data, covering everything from the most pleasurable guilty pleasures to how long it takes different condiments to spoil to world maps of Internet search terms.
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Six Months (Seven Series #2) by Dannika Dark

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Six Months (Seven Series #2) by Dannika Dark
English | March 23, 2014 | ISBN-10: 1495405915 | 340 pages | EPUB | 0.5 MB
Destiny will find you. April Frost is a compassionate young woman with a steady job and ambitious goals. But the harder she runs away from her past, the more it threatens to destroy her. When three strangers enter her life, April is forced to face her demons and it's a battle she may not win.

Six Months (Seven Series #2) by Dannika Dark
Private investigators in the Breed world are men who take risks, and Reno Cole is no exception. As a Shifter, he's expected to control his inner animal. But lately his wolf has been venturing dangerously close to the city, and he's about to discover why. When Reno is reintroduced to a family friend, the attraction is immediate. April captivates him with her secretive eyes and resilient spirit. She's also in trouble, and despite the fact she's a human, Reno can't turn his back on her.

April is caught between two worlds: One that threatens to bury her dreams and another that could fulfill them. Can she trust the wolf at her door and find the courage to overcome her demons?

17+
No Cliffhanger
HEA
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If Hemingway Wrote JavaScript

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Angus Croll, "If Hemingway Wrote javascript"
2014 | ISBN: 1593275854 | 192 pages | EPUB | 12 MB

If Hemingway Wrote JavaScript
What if William Shakespeare were asked to generate the Fibonacci series or Jane Austen had to write a factorial program? In , author Angus Croll imagines short javascript programs as written by famous wordsmiths. The result is a peculiar and charming combination of prose, poetry, and programming.

The best authors are those who obsess about language—and the same goes for javascript developers. To master either craft, you must experiment with language to develop your own style, your own idioms, and your own expressions. To that end, playfully bridges the worlds of programming and literature for the literary geek in all of us.

Featuring original artwork by Miran Lipovaca.
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